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  • Prohibited/Noxious Plants, SA, Tas only ATM

    This list only covers South Australia and Tasmania (2013) at the moment. I will be updating and adding all states soon, Text list for all states is at the end of the Tasmanian list The information and pictures came from the Australian National Botanical Gardens/Australian Plant Image Index http://www.anbg.gov.au/index.html. It is not my work, I just put it together for you all for a state by state quick reference.

    South Australia


    Alligator Weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is a stoloniferous and rhizomatous perennial herb that can grow in or on water and also on dry land. In water it either roots on the banks or bottom of shallow water bodies or floats freely on the water surface with roots trailing from the stem internodes. It produces masses of creeping and layering stems up to 10 m long which can root at the nodes. Over water, stems grow up to 60 cm high and have large, hollow internodes that aid in floatation. On land, stems are shorter and internodes are smaller and much less hollow. Tap roots on land can reach depths exceeding 500 mm.





    Arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis) is an erect tufted aquatic annual or short-lived perennial to about 1 m tall, with 2-12 whorls of flowers at the apex. There are two kinds of leaves, emergent and submerged. The emergent leaves, which rise out of the water, are broadly arrow-shaped to 25 cm long and 20 cm wide, with long basal lobes. The submerged leaves are strap-like and translucent. The flowers are white, sometimes with a purple patch in the centre, about 2.5 cm wide and in whorls of three, that is, three flowers arising from the same position on the stem. The lower whorls are female and the upper ones male. Both male and female flowers have 3 petals. The fruit is a cluster about 2 cm wide with 1-seeded segments, each seed being flattened, winged and 2-3 mm long. The roots are brown and fibrous when growing as annuals but with short fleshy rhizomes (underground stems) when growing as perennials (Parsons & Cuthbertson 2001; Thorp & Wilson 1998 -; Department of Agriculture and Food undated). Two subspecies of Arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis) have been identified in Australia. They are subsp. montevidensis in which the petals are white with a purple patch at the base, and subsp. calycina, in which the petals are white only. There are other differences in internal flower structure.





    Cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana) is a perennial aquatic herb with branched stems that have white or reddish brown hairs growing on them. It is fully submerged, except for occasional leaves and flowers that float and later emerge on stalks several centimetres above the water surface. It roots at the nodes of creeping runners (stolons or rhizomes) and lower stems into the substrate on the bottom of water bodies, and the stems (up to 5 m or even sometimes 10 m long) can reach the surface. Parts of the plant can survive free-floating for 6-8 weeks.





    Canadian Pond Weed (Elodea canadensis) is a submerged aquatic long-lived (perennial) herb. It has brittle, branched stems usually up to 3 m, sometimes up to 6 m long and is rooted to the substrate. The stems are produced off short runners (stolons) and grow towards the surface forming a thick green mass at, and just below, the water level. The stalkless leaves are arranged in whorls (in rings around the stem) of 3 (rarely 4 or 5) along the stems, and are mid to dark green, often curled and more or less narrowly oblong to oval-shaped or egg-shaped. The leaves are 5-15 mm or sometimes up to 20 mm long and 1-5 mm wide, with the margins minutely toothed with fine, dark-tipped, forward-pointing teeth or sometimes smooth-edged. The internodes (the sections of stem between joints/leaf whorls) are 3-25 mm long but become shorter near the tip. The lower leaves are small and egg-shaped, in opposite pairs.





    Eurasian Water Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) is a mostly submerged perennial aquatic herb, that is rooted in the substrate. Its stems are hairless, reddish brown to whitish pink, up to 7 m or more long and 5 mm wide, generally branching near the water surface to form a dense canopy and becoming leafless towards the base. Its leaves are robust, all submerged, in rings of three or four around the stem, greyish green or olive-green, 1.5-4 cm long and stiffly feather-like. Each leaf has 14-24 pairs of fine, linear segments, 6-12 mm long. Male and female flowers are on the same plant. The flower heads form at the tips of the stems, above the water, and are narrow spikes up to 8 cm long with rings of four small flowers. Female flowers are in the lower rings and are about 1 mm long, they lack petals and are greenish in colour. Male flowers are in the upper rings, with four reddish or pink petals, to 2.5 mm long, and eight stamens. The fruit is egg-shaped, 3 mm long, with four dry, 1-seeded nutlets.





    Horsetails (Equisetum spp.) are a primitive, non-flowering perennial plant related to ferns. There are 30 species world-wide, of which 12 are considered weedy. They produce two different kinds of shoots from long underground stems called rhizomes. The pale brown fertile fronds bearing fruiting cones emerge in spring and die after shedding spores. Sterile green, hollow branched shoots then develop. Both kinds of shoots break easily at the joints (CRC 2003; Groves et al. 2005).
    Inconspicuous leaves on the main shoots grow in rings of 6 to 18, joined at their edges to form a black-tipped sheath of sharp teeth around the stem (CRC 2003). The Common Horsetail (E. arvense) shoots usually die back over winter. However, above ground growth may persist over the winter months in other species (CRC 2003).




    Scouring Rush Horsetail (E. hyemale) was given its common name due to the high silica content in the plant tissues (CRC 2003). The shoots have been used to scour pots and pans (Weeds Australia).






    Hydrocotyl (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides) is a hairless, perennial herb with long, creeping stolons that root profusely at the nodes and grow over land and out over the water. In water the leaves are emergent or sometimes floating. The leaf blades are circular or broadly kidney-shaped, 1.5-5 cm or more long and 2-12 cm wide, with small rounded teeth and shallowly to deeply 7-11-lobed (sometimes 3-6-lobed), and deeply notched with a radial slit at the base where it is joined underneath to a long leaf stalk (petiole). The stolons are trailing stems or runners that have leaves and roots at the nodes. The roots can be up to 60 cm long trailing in the water, or they anchor the mats into the riverbanks or stream bed.
    The inconspicuous, small, white, whitish green, or creamy yellow flowers (3-4 mm across) are arranged in umbels (umbrella-like clusters) where the more or less equal length (1-2 mm long) slender stalks of 5-10 individual flowers arise in a cluster at the top of a slender, 2-6 cm long peduncle or main inflorescence stalk that grows below the leaves. The fruit is more or less circular in outline, 2-3 mm across, laterally compressed and breaking into ribbed segments.





    Lagarosiphon (Lagarosiphon major) is a perennial, submerged aquatic herb. It reaches its maximum growth in clear water up to a depth of 7 m, but may only grow to 1 m depth in murky water. It has numerous thread-like roots arising from stem nodes that, along with rhizomes (horizontal stems in the sediment), anchor it to the bottom. Fixed or free-floating stems are up to 5 m or sometimes more long and can reach the water surface. They are brittle and sparsely branched, 3-5 mm in diameter.
    Leaves are 5-20 mm long and 2-3 mm wide, somewhat stiff and arranged in alternate spirals along the stems, more crowded near the tips of branches than towards the base where they are usually well spaced. They generally have minutely toothed margins, and tapered tips strongly curving downwards towards the stem, except in low alkalinity water where they are straight.
    Male and female flowers are on different plants. The solitary, three-petalled female flowers are very small (about 3 mm across), transparent to white or pinkish and float on the surface while remaining attached to the plant by a very thin white to translucent filament- or thread-like stalk. The solitary male flowers break off and float to the surface; neither they nor fruit nor seeds have been recorded outside its native range.





    Leafy Elodea or Dense Waterweed (Egeria densa) is a submerged, multi-branched, perennial aquatic herb growing as an underwater mass in fresh water. It is usually rooted in the substrate, but occasionally it forms a dense free-floating mat just below the water surface. The green to brownish slender stems are up to 1.5 m long, sometimes to 5 m long, rooting at the lower joints (nodes) and buoyant so most of the growth is near the surface. The upper internodes (sections of stem between the nodes or joints) are crowded together and are often less than 2 mm apart) while they are longer near the base because the nodes are wider apart. The stalkless leaves are arranged in whorls (in rings around the stems) of 4 or 5 (rarely 3 or 6-8). The basal leaves are small and in opposite pairs, green to dark green, strap-like, tapering to a pointed or rounded tip, 15-40 mm long and 2-5 mm wide, often bent backwards and occasionally slightly twisted, 1-veined, and the margins are minutely toothed or serrated with fine translucent teeth which can only be seen clearly under a hand lens. They are mostly densely clustered or very crowded towards the ends of the branches near the growing tips.
    The plants are dioecious (with male and female flowers occurring on separate plants) and only male plants are known in Australia. The floating flowers grow from the upper leaf axils (angle between leaf and branch) and have a thread-like hypanthium (a floral tube that is like a stalk that elongates to take the flower to the water surface) up to 8 cm long. Male flowers (about 1.5-2 cm in diameter) occur alone or in groups of 2-5. They have 3 boat-shaped sepals (outer 'petals', modified leaves), that are 3-4 mm long, and 3 showy white petals, mostly 9-12 mm long and 6-9 mm wide. Female flowers (not seen in Australia) are solitary and have 3 spoon-shaped sepals about 3 mm long and 3 broad, unequal white petals 6-8 mm long and 5-8 mm wide. The cylindrical berry-like fruit that develops in female flowers is 7-8 mm long and about 3 mm in diameter.





    Poison Buttercup or Celery Buttercup (Ranunculus sceleratus) is an annual or biennial hairless or sparsely hairy herb that grows up to 80 cm (but usually less than 50 cm) high. It reproduces by seed only. The stems are usually multi-branched above the base, hollow at least in the lower part, arising from a tuft of basal leaves with stalks to 20 cm long with blades 2-8 cm long divided into 3 or 5 bluntly toothed or lobed segments. The upper leaves are shorter-stalked and less divided with the uppermost ones often more or less oblong and quite stalkless. The flowers (5 - 10 mm in diameter) are at the ends of stalks typically 3-5 cm long, with 5 outer green segments (sepals) 2-4 mm long, and 5 narrow, pale yellow petals 3-4 mm long. The central part of the flower somewhat resembles a small unripe strawberry, with numerous ovules (unripe seeds) crowded onto a domed axis, and is surrounded by about 20 stamens. As the fruits develop, the central axis of the flower elongates to be finally about 1 cm long and bearing 100-700 small (about 1 mm long) seeds, each with a minute beak at the tip.





    Sagittaria (Sagittaria platyphylla) is an emergent aquatic perennial to 1.2 m tall, rooted in the swamp floor and reproducing by seeds, rhizomes (underground stems) and tubers. The stems are triangular in cross-section. The submerged leaves are translucent and strap-like, to 50 cm long. The emergent leaves (those rising out of the water) are lance-shaped to 28 cm long and 10 cm wide, on a long stalk. The white, sometimes pink, flowers appear at the top of a leafless stalk, always below leaf height, in 2-12 whorls of three, that is, three flowers arising from the same position on the stem. The whorls of male flowers are at the top and female ones at the bottom. Both male and female flowers have 3 petals. The fruit is a cluster of 1-seeded segments, each segment flattened, winged and 1.5-3 mm long.





    Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) is a free-floating aquatic fern that can grow rapidly to cover the entire water surface with a thick mat of vegetation. The fronds are arranged along the stems in threes. Two fronds are leaf-like, more or less round in shape, 7-40 mm long and 7-25 mm wide, pale green to greenish brown, frequently overlapping and folded along the midrib (McCarthy 1998). The upper surfaces of these fronds are covered with distinctive eggbeater-shaped hairs 2-4 mm long that diverge into four branches near the top and fuse together at the tips (DiTomaso & Healy 2003). The third frond is submerged in water, root-like and slender, up to 30 cm long and covered with fine brown hairs. Salvinia plants are usually sterile. If sporocarps (spore sacs) are formed they are 2-3 mm long and borne in clusters along the root-like leaves. Spores, when produced, are not viable.





    Senegal Tea Plant (Gymnocoronis spilanthoides) can grow as an erect, rounded bush up to 1 m tall, but is more commonly found as a scrambling form extending from the edges of waterways, and forming dense tangled mats in open water. Young stems are 5-10 mm in diameter, increasing to 20 mm with age. Larger stems are hollow between the nodes (the joints between segments of stem) and float on water, and can reach a length of 1.5 m. The leaves are dark green, 50-200 mm long and arranged in opposite pairs along the stem. The edges of the spearhead-shaped leaves are serrated. The numerous, white or purplish-white, ball-shaped flowers, 15-20 mm in diameter, occur at the ends of stems. The ribbed seeds are yellow-brown and 5 mm in diameter. Thin, fibrous roots can develop at any node that is in contact with moist soil or immersed in water.





    Trapa natans

    Water-chestnut (Trapa natans) is a rooted, floating plant that invades shallow to deep, fresh water habitats in the northeastern United States. Water chestnut can grow in 12 to 15 ft. (3.6-4.6 m) of water and forms dense, floating mats, often three layers deep. The rosette of leaves on the surface of the water are alternate, triangular in shape, strongly dentate (toothed) and connected to the stem by an inflated petiole. Submerged leaves are feathery and either opposite or alternate. The nut-like fruit have two to four, 0.5 in. (1.3 cm) long, sharp, barbed spines. They ripen in about a month and can remain viable as long as 12 years. The spines can penetrate shoes. Each seed can produce 1-15 rosettes and each rosette can produce as many as 20 seeds. The dense, floating mats restrict light availability, reduce the oxygen content, and displace other emergent and floating vegetation. Water-chestnut also limits boating, fishing, swimming and other recreational activities. Water-chestnut is native to Europe and Asia.





    Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an erect, free-floating (sometimes attached to the mud and creeping), aquatic perennial herb, varying from 10 cm to 1 m in height where nutrient levels are high. Its roots are black to purple, feathery and up to 1 m long hanging in the water. They are usually short if the water is nutrient-rich. It also has horizontal stems (stolons) which root at the joints (nodes) to form daughter plants.
    The leaves radiate from the base to form a cluster or rosette. The leaf stalk (petiole) is spongy, often inflated and buoyant, 2.5-75 cm long, up to 3 cm in diameter. It is short and abruptly swollen in young plants and more tapered and slender in adult plants. The leaf blade is flat, thick, ovate or circular to rounded-oblong, up to 15 cm or sometimes to 25 cm across, with a tip that has an abrupt point or is blunt or rarely indented, glossy green, finely striated with numerous longitudinal veins, the margin gently upcurved and often slightly wavy.
    The flowering stalk is up to 50 cm or more long and bears a flower spike that slightly exceeds the leaves. The flower spike is up to 20 cm long, with few to many crowded flowers. The showy flowers are 3-7 cm across with 6 'petals' (actually the lobes of the calyx and the corolla) that are 3-5 cm long, fused below and vary in colour from sky-blue to bluish purple-lavender, lilac-blue, lilac-mauve, pale violet or sometimes white, with the upper lobe having a darker purple or blue patch with a yellow centre.
    The fruits are 3-chambered capsules to about 15 mm long, containing up to 300 ribbed seeds about 1-1.5 mm long. The fruiting structure recurves to become submerged.





    Water Soldier (Stratiotes aloides) is a perennial (long lived) aquatic herb that is usually floating and partly emergent in summer then submerged in winter. It has a rosette (basal cluster) of leaves and forms runners that develop new rosettes at their tips. Plants have a distinctive appearance: they resemble the top of a pineapple or an aloe plant, with showy white flowers. The rosette leaves are linear to very narrowly triangular or sword-shaped, pointed, triangular in cross-section, with numerous longitudinal parallel veins with cross-veins, and are brittle when handled. Submerged leaves are thin, soft, pale green to reddish and up to 60 cm long (although occasionally longer) and to 1 cm wide with little spines along the margins. Emergent leaves are thick, rigid, dark green, up to 40 cm long and 7-25 mm (but sometimes up to 40 mm) wide with well developed spines along the edges (they are more conspicuously sawtooth edged or serrated than the submerged leaves).
    There are separate male and female plants. At the top of a thick flower stalk up to 30 cm or more long, there is a two leaved sheath that encloses one or rarely two flowers (in female plants) or three to six stalked flowers in male plants. These showy flowers have three white petals with a yellow patch in the centre, are up to 30 mm long (with female flowers smaller than male flowers) and are foul-smelling.
    The fruit is a pulpy, flask-shaped, leathery, berry like capsule, 12-34 mm long, and containing up to 24 cylindrical seeds. The roots either hang freely in the water or are loosely anchored in the mud. Plants may be entirely submerged, except when they rise to the water surface for flowering, or be partly submerged with the leaf tips protruding out of the water.




    Tasmania


    Alligator Weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is a stoloniferous and rhizomatous perennial herb that can grow in or on water and also on dry land. In water it either roots on the banks or bottom of shallow water bodies or floats freely on the water surface with roots trailing from the stem internodes. It produces masses of creeping and layering stems up to 10 m long which can root at the nodes. Over water, stems grow up to 60 cm high and have large, hollow internodes that aid in floatation. On land, stems are shorter and internodes are smaller and much less hollow. Tap roots on land can reach depths exceeding 500 mm.





    Arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis) is an erect tufted aquatic annual or short-lived perennial to about 1 m tall, with 2-12 whorls of flowers at the apex. There are two kinds of leaves, emergent and submerged. The emergent leaves, which rise out of the water, are broadly arrow-shaped to 25 cm long and 20 cm wide, with long basal lobes. The submerged leaves are strap-like and translucent. The flowers are white, sometimes with a purple patch in the centre, about 2.5 cm wide and in whorls of three, that is, three flowers arising from the same position on the stem. The lower whorls are female and the upper ones male. Both male and female flowers have 3 petals. The fruit is a cluster about 2 cm wide with 1-seeded segments, each seed being flattened, winged and 2-3 mm long. The roots are brown and fibrous when growing as annuals but with short fleshy rhizomes (underground stems) when growing as perennials (Parsons & Cuthbertson 2001; Thorp & Wilson 1998 -; Department of Agriculture and Food undated). Two subspecies of Arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis) have been identified in Australia. They are subsp. montevidensis in which the petals are white with a purple patch at the base, and subsp. calycina, in which the petals are white only. There are other differences in internal flower structure.



    Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata) Image and info to come.





    Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an erect, free-floating (sometimes attached to the mud and creeping), aquatic perennial herb, varying from 10 cm to 1 m in height where nutrient levels are high. Its roots are black to purple, feathery and up to 1 m long hanging in the water. They are usually short if the water is nutrient-rich. It also has horizontal stems (stolons) which root at the joints (nodes) to form daughter plants.
    The leaves radiate from the base to form a cluster or rosette. The leaf stalk (petiole) is spongy, often inflated and buoyant, 2.5-75 cm long, up to 3 cm in diameter. It is short and abruptly swollen in young plants and more tapered and slender in adult plants. The leaf blade is flat, thick, ovate or circular to rounded-oblong, up to 15 cm or sometimes to 25 cm across, with a tip that has an abrupt point or is blunt or rarely indented, glossy green, finely striated with numerous longitudinal veins, the margin gently upcurved and often slightly wavy.
    The flowering stalk is up to 50 cm or more long and bears a flower spike that slightly exceeds the leaves. The flower spike is up to 20 cm long, with few to many crowded flowers. The showy flowers are 3-7 cm across with 6 'petals' (actually the lobes of the calyx and the corolla) that are 3-5 cm long, fused below and vary in colour from sky-blue to bluish purple-lavender, lilac-blue, lilac-mauve, pale violet or sometimes white, with the upper lobe having a darker purple or blue patch with a yellow centre.
    The fruits are 3-chambered capsules to about 15 mm long, containing up to 300 ribbed seeds about 1-1.5 mm long. The fruiting structure recurves to become submerged
    .



    Water Lettuce
    (Pistia Straiotes)
    Image and info to come.





    Leafy Elodea or Dense Waterweed (Egeria densa) is a submerged, multi-branched, perennial aquatic herb growing as an underwater mass in fresh water. It is usually rooted in the substrate, but occasionally it forms a dense free-floating mat just below the water surface. The green to brownish slender stems are up to 1.5 m long, sometimes to 5 m long, rooting at the lower joints (nodes) and buoyant so most of the growth is near the surface. The upper internodes (sections of stem between the nodes or joints) are crowded together and are often less than 2 mm apart) while they are longer near the base because the nodes are wider apart. The stalkless leaves are arranged in whorls (in rings around the stems) of 4 or 5 (rarely 3 or 6-8). The basal leaves are small and in opposite pairs, green to dark green, strap-like, tapering to a pointed or rounded tip, 15-40 mm long and 2-5 mm wide, often bent backwards and occasionally slightly twisted, 1-veined, and the margins are minutely toothed or serrated with fine translucent teeth which can only be seen clearly under a hand lens. They are mostly densely clustered or very crowded towards the ends of the branches near the growing tips.
    The plants are dioecious (with male and female flowers occurring on separate plants) and only male plants are known in Australia. The floating flowers grow from the upper leaf axils (angle between leaf and branch) and have a thread-like hypanthium (a floral tube that is like a stalk that elongates to take the flower to the water surface) up to 8 cm long. Male flowers (about 1.5-2 cm in diameter) occur alone or in groups of 2-5. They have 3 boat-shaped sepals (outer 'petals', modified leaves), that are 3-4 mm long, and 3 showy white petals, mostly 9-12 mm long and 6-9 mm wide. Female flowers (not seen in Australia) are solitary and have 3 spoon-shaped sepals about 3 mm long and 3 broad, unequal white petals 6-8 mm long and 5-8 mm wide. The cylindrical berry-like fruit that develops in female flowers is 7-8 mm long and about 3 mm in diameter.







    Senegal Tea Plant (Gymnocoronis spilanthoides) can grow as an erect, rounded bush up to 1 m tall, but is more commonly found as a scrambling form extending from the edges of waterways, and forming dense tangled mats in open water. Young stems are 5-10 mm in diameter, increasing to 20 mm with age. Larger stems are hollow between the nodes (the joints between segments of stem) and float on water, and can reach a length of 1.5 m. The leaves are dark green, 50-200 mm long and arranged in opposite pairs along the stem. The edges of the spearhead-shaped leaves are serrated. The numerous, white or purplish-white, ball-shaped flowers, 15-20 mm in diameter, occur at the ends of stems. The ribbed seeds are yellow-brown and 5 mm in diameter. Thin, fibrous roots can develop at any node that is in contact with moist soil or immersed in water.







    Canadian Pond Weed (Elodea canadensis) is a submerged aquatic long-lived (perennial) herb. It has brittle, branched stems usually up to 3 m, sometimes up to 6 m long and is rooted to the substrate. The stems are produced off short runners (stolons) and grow towards the surface forming a thick green mass at, and just below, the water level. The stalkless leaves are arranged in whorls (in rings around the stem) of 3 (rarely 4 or 5) along the stems, and are mid to dark green, often curled and more or less narrowly oblong to oval-shaped or egg-shaped. The leaves are 5-15 mm or sometimes up to 20 mm long and 1-5 mm wide, with the margins minutely toothed with fine, dark-tipped, forward-pointing teeth or sometimes smooth-edged. The internodes (the sections of stem between joints/leaf whorls) are 3-25 mm long but become shorter near the tip. The lower leaves are small and egg-shaped, in opposite pairs.





    Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) is a free-floating aquatic fern that can grow rapidly to cover the entire water surface with a thick mat of vegetation. The fronds are arranged along the stems in threes. Two fronds are leaf-like, more or less round in shape, 7-40 mm long and 7-25 mm wide, pale green to greenish brown, frequently overlapping and folded along the midrib (McCarthy 1998). The upper surfaces of these fronds are covered with distinctive eggbeater-shaped hairs 2-4 mm long that diverge into four branches near the top and fuse together at the tips (DiTomaso & Healy 2003). The third frond is submerged in water, root-like and slender, up to 30 cm long and covered with fine brown hairs. Salvinia plants are usually sterile. If sporocarps (spore sacs) are formed they are 2-3 mm long and borne in clusters along the root-like leaves. Spores, when produced, are not viable.





    Lagarosiphon (Lagarosiphon major) is a perennial, submerged aquatic herb. It reaches its maximum growth in clear water up to a depth of 7 m, but may only grow to 1 m depth in murky water. It has numerous thread-like roots arising from stem nodes that, along with rhizomes (horizontal stems in the sediment), anchor it to the bottom. Fixed or free-floating stems are up to 5 m or sometimes more long and can reach the water surface. They are brittle and sparsely branched, 3-5 mm in diameter.
    Leaves are 5-20 mm long and 2-3 mm wide, somewhat stiff and arranged in alternate spirals along the stems, more crowded near the tips of branches than towards the base where they are usually well spaced. They generally have minutely toothed margins, and tapered tips strongly curving downwards towards the stem, except in low alkalinity water where they are straight.
    Male and female flowers are on different plants. The solitary, three-petalled female flowers are very small (about 3 mm across), transparent to white or pinkish and float on the surface while remaining attached to the plant by a very thin white to translucent filament- or thread-like stalk. The solitary male flowers break off and float to the surface; neither they nor fruit nor seeds have been recorded outside its native range.



    Cabomba, Fanwort
    (Cabomba Caroliniana)
    Image and info to come.



    Parrots Feather, Brazilian Water Milfoil
    (Myriophyllum Aquaticum)Image and info to come.



    Hornwort (Ceratophyllum Demersum) Image and info to come.




    This is the text list I am working from.

    Alligator Weed
    (Alternanthera Philoxeroides) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, Vic, SA, WA, ACT, Tas, NT

    Sagittaria, Arrowhead (Sagittaria Platyphylla or Sagittaria Graminea ssp. Platyphylla) Prohibited in: SA, WA, Tas

    Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata) Prohibited in: Tas

    Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia Crassipes) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, Vic, SA, WA, ACT, Tas, NT

    Water Lettuce (Pistia Straiotes) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, WA, ACT, Tas, NT

    Ludwigia, Peruvian Primrose (Ludwigia Peruviana) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, SA

    Leafy Elodea, Dense Waterweed (Egeria Densa) Prohibited in: SA, WA, Tas, NT

    Senegal Tea Plant, Temple Plant (Gymnocoronis Spilanthoides) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, SA, ACT, Tas

    Elodea, Canadian Pondweed (Elodea Canadensis) Prohibited in: SA, WA, Tas, NT

    Salvinia (Salvinia Molesta) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, Vic, ACT, SA, WA, Tas, NT

    Lagarosiphon (Lagarosiphon Major) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, Vic, SA, WA, Tas, NT

    Cabomba, Fanwort (Cabomba Caroliniana) Prohibited in: Qld, NSW, WA, Tas, NT

    Hydrocotyl, Pennywort (Hydrocotyle Ranunculoides) Prohibited in: SA, WA

    Parrots Feather, Brazilian Water Milfoil (Myriophyllum Aquaticum) Prohibited in: WA, Tas

    Hornwort (Ceratophyllum Demersum) Prohibited in: Tas




    Information on prohibited plants is available by contacting:

    Queensland: Department of Natural Resources on 1800 803 788

    NSW
    : New South Wales Agriculture on 1800 680 244

    Victoria
    : Department of Natural Resources and Environment on (03) 9412 4011

    WA
    : Agriculture Western Australia on (08) 9368 3333

    SA
    : Animal and Plant Control Commission on (08) 8303 9500

    ACT
    : ACT Parks and Conservation Service on (02) 6207 2278

    NT
    : Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries on (08) 8999 2348

    Tasmania
    : Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries on 131368 ask for regional weed management officer).
    Last edited by atwistedlife; 30-01-13, 08:53 AM. Reason: added Tasmania

    . ...Leigh

  • #2
    Brilliant work Leigh, thankyou!
    Can I suggest that you put a line between each one, to make it easier to see which picture relates to which write-up?

    I'm going to make this a sticky, hope you don't mind, particularly if you're planning to add any other states to it.
    "Weeds are just plants growing in the wrong place" - Jackie French
    Gardening is just racism for plants - Amber, The Old Guys

    Comment


    • #3
      Sticky cool TY and yes I will add the lines now
      Adding all remaining states soon

      . ...Leigh

      Comment


      • #4
        DE, Marimo Balls are only illegal to bring in to the country but are not illegal to have in any state if grown here, is that right? Can't find the info on those darn Balls.

        . ...Leigh

        Comment


        • #5
          Updated, SA completed and 90% of Tasmania done

          . ...Leigh

          Comment

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