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caloglossa cf. beccarii "Red Liverwart"

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  • caloglossa cf. beccarii "Red Liverwart"

    Very interesting looking plant...


  • #2
    Wish it was here.

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    • #3
      Interesting, but that tree scape is disgusting. Reminds me of choked waterways with that orange algae/bacteria sludge growing everywhere.
      Joe.

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      • #4
        How annoying...I want it! Would be a cool component for creating the impression of a Discus habitat.
        Love the treescape too!

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        • #5
          I am under the impression that when it's healthy it's dark red/black like Aponogeton crispus Red, rather than orange/brown.

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          • #6
            wow, wicked looking.

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            • #7
              If you're in SA go and find yourself some - different name, same morphology and ecology. Caloglossa leprieurii

              and here's a picture of a skinnier species also in SA (scroll down) Caloglossa ogasawaraensis
              In southern Australia, known only from Barker Inlet and Garden I., Port Adelaide, S. Australia, but possibly more widespread and unrecognised due to its diminutive size. Found in warmer water from a power station outlet, and possibly an introduced species.
              so... c'mon. gumboots people. Hi Ho, Hi Ho... it off to hunt we go... chop chop.

              ..but beware (Source)
              From time to time, Caloglossa cf. beccarii is deliberately cultivated as aquarium plant, but, however interesting this red alga may be, it can get very annoying, especially if it grows in tufts of moss or between slow-growing ephiphytes. Removal is difficult as rhizoids and parts of the thalli tend to remain in place, from which the alga will regrow. Due to its low light requirements it grows exceptionally well in dark corners and dense plant groups, too. Often it can only be removed from the tank by means of a totally new set-up.
              Last edited by Grubs; 26-06-14, 06:50 AM.

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              • #8
                It would be awesome if someone could find a freshwater species here. The two you linked to are from coastal/brackish/marine environments.

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                • #9
                  Still seems doable

                  Both Caloglossa leprieurii and Caloglossa ogasawaraensis are included in the Freshwater Algae of North America - collected from streams in Puerto Rico and Costa Rica.

                  This reference from 1902 is far more entertaining. I wish scientific publications were allowed this flowery prose.




                  Caloglossa beccarii is known from QLD
                  Last edited by Grubs; 26-06-14, 09:48 AM.

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                  • #10
                    That's fantastic news Seems like they can adapt or are adapted to freshwater.

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                    • #11
                      https://www.facebook.com/25230078481...406542/?type=1

                      Might not be a good idea to try to keep this with other (slow growing?) plants.

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                      • #12
                        Can we get them in aus?
                        They look totally cool and would contrast with a lot of plants...

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                        • #13
                          Check out Grubs' post above. You SA and Vic lot need to get your gumboots on over summer
                          Cheers,

                          Rufus


                          "I completely lost it. Well, okay, that sounded more awesome than what I really did, which was yell. And by yelling I mean sending a bunch of TEXT MESSAGES ALL IN CAPS!"

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                          • #14
                            Been researching this for some time.
                            Too many bad things are said about it, like it could spread in a tank like a cyanobacteria.
                            So be careful what you wish for.
                            Bluebell

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                            • #15
                              Just like at one time people thought marimo balls were cool but look what they made out of , clado . And look at the widespread clado problems in aquariums now . I'd be steering away from it and i think other people should also .

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