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Most energy efficient type of heating

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Loach View Post
    jagers run with half the wattage with some 'german' tech.
    huh? so they can heat up water to the same temperature with half the energy. Or is it that the heater wattage only needs to be half of a non-jager for the same size tank.

    Unless someone can state some reasonable reason, I am certain it cannot be the first regardless of what technology you use. And my reasoning for this is simple but solid. The second law of thermodynamics states that all energy eventually gets converted to heat. Therefore a heater is by nature 100% efficient at its job.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by victork View Post
      huh? so they can heat up water to the same temperature with half the energy. Or is it that the heater wattage only needs to be half of a non-jager for the same size tank.

      Unless someone can state some reasonable reason, I am certain it cannot be the first regardless of what technology you use. And my reasoning for this is simple but solid. The second law of thermodynamics states that all energy eventually gets converted to heat. Therefore a heater is by nature 100% efficient at its job.
      i think he means, a jager only needs to be half the size, i think....
      and i know they can heat larger volumes then normal heaters (my 300w jager is rated to 600l and an aquaone 300w heater is rated to 300l)
      i think its cause of the larger surface area - as jagers are a fair size larger.
      and wouldnt a larger surface allow for more efficient heat transfer than a small one?

      edit - victor you dont happen to be a engineer do you?
      Last edited by __CAV__; 14-04-12, 05:16 AM.

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      • #18
        Insulate the room well, then get your room air conditioned to 26 deg C. May not be the answer for one or two aquariums but when you get up to 60 aquariums it is much more economical. Who can stop at one.

        I keep 80,000 litres warm with solar. There are 2700 meters of 19mm poly pipe that can get my tanks up 6 deg C in one morning. The sun shines for 9 months here in the NT.


        Cheers
        Dave
        Attached Files

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        • #19
          All heat from a heater is lost into the tank.
          Only a tiny fraction of the electricity that goes into a heater is used for anything other than heat generation.
          The only thing that is different from 1 heater to the next is how quickly the heat dissipates into the tank.
          A 100 watt heater on for one hour uses the same energy as as a 200 watt heater on for half an hour and puts the same amount of heat energy into the water.
          Subwassertang- Proof that when enough people are wrong it's accepted as right.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by __CAV__ View Post
            i think he means, a jager only needs to be half the size, i think....
            and i know they can heat larger volumes then normal heaters (my 300w jager is rated to 600l and an aquaone 300w heater is rated to 300l)
            i think its cause of the larger surface area - as jagers are a fair size larger.
            and wouldnt a larger surface allow for more efficient heat transfer than a small one?

            edit - victor you dont happen to be a engineer do you?
            larger surface area would mean that the temperature gradient between the heater and water is lower. yep i am an engineer

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            • #21
              Originally posted by victork View Post
              Unless someone can state some reasonable reason, I am certain it cannot be the first regardless of what technology you use. And my reasoning for this is simple but solid. The second law of thermodynamics states that all energy eventually gets converted to heat. Therefore a heater is by nature 100% efficient at its job.
              Just to play devil's advocate, one might also take into consideration how efficient the device is at transmitting the heat to the water. Greater insulation from the housing may require more energy in the short term to bring the water to the set point and result in more residual heat. Appropriate sizing (power to volume), circulation and thermostat histrionics also come into play. That said, in real terms the overall efficiency should remain about the same, but there could be a wider fluctuation in water temperature.

              As for Jager heaters being more efficient, be aware that many manufacturers tend to overstate specifications, while others may offer a more realistic expectation.

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              • #22
                I always found it interesting that electrical items are rated in watts,

                If a heater is 100 watts that means it "consumes" up to 100 watts of energy when it's on.

                There is no measurement given for its actual "output"

                The factor of a wattage rating with electricity is purely to indicate how much energy it uses. however people blindly believe that more is better when there is only a vague connection between power consumption and performance output.

                Juls

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                • #23
                  Best thing you can do is improve your insulation, so that the heater doesn't come on all the time.My tanks are in my garage. I have done the following.

                  1. Insulated my garage roof with batts.

                  2. Installed a whirly bird and closable grilling the garage ceiling, as heat is just as bad to your fish as cold. Also we have the fridge in the garage and too much heat makes the fridge over work.

                  3. I have insatlled bubble wrap style insulation on my garage panel door and then covered it in 30mm styrofoam. This makes for excellent insulation.

                  4. I have insulated the 3 non viewing sides of all my tanks. I have used a foil with a foam backing and double sided tape. You could just use thin styrofoam for the same result.

                  5. I have vents in the lower part of my garage that I can open in summer and close in winter.

                  6. If you park your car in the garage that will help to keep the ambient temperature up in winter . Avoid bringing a hot car into a garage in summer, especially and insulated garage, until it has cooled down.

                  7 I have our clothes dryer in the garage and that adds to keeping the ambient temperature up over winter when we have to use it on cold wet days.

                  8. Tank placement is key. The more exposed upper tanks are for cold water species such as Rhads and blueeyes. And the tropicals are the tanks lower down the rack where the tanks are more insulated and retain more heat.

                  9.The sides and back of my rack are covered in Styrofoam and core flute for extra insulation.

                  10. Place fish racks if possible against an inside wall.

                  11. have a covering on the floor of fish room, either carpet tiles or paint the floor. You would be amazed at how much heat is lost through bare concrete floors.

                  12 have curtains or styrofoam over any windows or sliding doors as bare glass will bleed a lot of heat out of a room.

                  13 buy a laser thermometer gun, to hunt for cold spots, and block all draughts.


                  My fish area stays at a constant 23 degrees in winter and uses very little heat from heaters.

                  All these changes also helps to keep the house warmer in winter and cooler in summer.It used to be the other way around .

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