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Crypt 'Rosanervig' colouration

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  • Crypt 'Rosanervig' colouration

    In trolling through a stack of photos of this cultivar I have noticed that the characteristic leaves are very variable, from plain green without veining, to yellow orange or pink veins.

    Anyone know if there is a specific parameter that needs to be controlled to determine the colouration (e.g. iron, light intensity or nitrate limitation) or is it more of an overall happiness thing?

    cheers
    -Mat-
    I cant think of anything cooler..Oh wait, a T-Rex eating a terradactyl while fighting a giant robot made of ninjas, surrounded by cheer-leaders, a dance squad, and lazers. That would be cooler.

  • #2
    Originally posted by wormboy View Post
    In trolling through a stack of photos of this cultivar I have noticed that the characteristic leaves are very variable, from plain green without veining, to yellow orange or pink veins.

    Anyone know if there is a specific parameter that needs to be controlled to determine the colouration (e.g. iron, light intensity or nitrate limitation) or is it more of an overall happiness thing?

    cheers
    -Mat-
    Great question, I'd love to know the answer to this as well. From what I've been able to find out it's very difficult to get veining in both aquariums and emersed culture over a prolonged period. People are often finding veining crypts in the wild but have difficulty continuing that growth pattern once taken home. This picture http://www.xs4all.nl/~crypts/Cryptoc..._B619_1797.jpg I've heard from some is a fake, the flower was from a different plant and placed there for the photo. Not sure how true that is, I'd love mine to look like that and flower.

    I have one veining for me ATM seen here; http://aquariumlife.com.au/showpost....3&postcount=19 but I'm doubtful that it will maintain this pattern. A second leaf is developing on this plant now ... time will tell. It might not even be a Rosanervig. It's growing right next to my oldest one that isn't displaying any veining and is about to flower again. My lighting is not intense, one T8 from 8am to 8pm and another T8 from 1pm to 4pm.
    Last edited by BrianS; 20-11-09, 01:29 PM.

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    • #3
      mine always has pink veins, but admittedly (the whole plant, not the colour) seems to fade over time. i have medium light and medium to heavy fish load with minimal ferts.
      Katy

      48x14x18", 200L - community planted | 50x50x50cm, 125L - south american | 33x12x16", 100L - community planted | 15L, betta

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      • #4
        I think Dave once told me that blassii and rosanervig prefer slightly cooler water, strong waterflow and a nutrient rich substrate to do well.

        I have grown both of them in different tanks over the past few years and what i have noticed is that they need a long time to establish (3 to 4 months) before they start producing good foilage, similiar to Crinums.

        I don't think that limiting certain nutrient levels would make a difference in colour (like with Rotalas, Ludwigias, etc..), but i'm not sure about that.

        Keeping the substrate beneath well fertilized and the PH near neutral would be a good idea in my opinion to get maximum results.

        Here are a few old pics of my rosanervig and blassii:










        HTH.
        Wolfgang.
        sigpic


        Subvert the dominant paradigm!

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        • #5
          Barely noticeable, but the first time this Rosanervig in my emersed tank has ever shown any signs of veining. Just 2 weeks after adding some fertiliser to the substrate and the next leaf up shows some sign of veining. The fertiliser was a mixed teaspoon of "Osmocote native garden" & "Blood and Bone" wrapped in newspaper and buried in the pot. It's the first time I've used that combination.



          I had a smaller one do something similar after adding dino dung, I've just now added more dino dung to that one so it should be interesting to see if it repeats. It only had one leaf show veining and the next leaf to grow was green. So it could be the stress from digging a hole in the substrate or getting a feed that can be a trigger. I'd love to get some colours like Wolfgang's pic above though .... stunning stuff.

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          • #6
            Both Wolfgang and Brian are on track.
            Grown in a nutrient rich soil with at least 4hrs of morning sun will almost guarantee good colour in this plant.
            I grow a rare hot pink Philodendron with the unfortunate name of Pink Princess.
            It was the result of an abberation in tissue cultured Philo's in the early 70's and grown as a novelty.
            It fell out of popularity because of the difficulty growers' had in producing a good looking plant in a pot.
            Older leaves slowly fade and young leaves can be burnt if the light is too strong.
            As well,as Wolfgang mentioned,they take time to establish.
            The plant needs to grow enough of the chlorophyll depleted leaves to have the energy to grow a decent coloured leaf.

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            • #7
              From my experience, this crypt needs a very rich nutrient substrate and minimal lighting to produce/maintain the pink veins. I've a handful back in Singapore and they are growing well producing new plantlets. There are some in a high lighting tank and they are unable to maintain the pink veins.

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              • #8
                I think with this type of variegation it is a matter of striking the right balance.
                In full colour,the leaf has about half the chlorophyll of a green leaf.
                The pink and white areas are vulnerable to burning from bright light.
                Yet the more light,the better the colour......haha.
                This is because the green parts of the plant produce the energy needed to grow a brightly coloured leaf.
                High ferts will encourage green growth for the first few months.
                Once established,the plant is able to utilise the light and ferts to grow nice leaves.
                As people have noticed,older leaves tend to go green.
                If not,the plant would not have enough chlorophyll to continue growing.

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                • #9
                  Check out the veining this guy is getting using standard potting soil supplemented with osmocote;
                  http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/f...7&postcount=14

                  Scroll down past the spathe pictures.

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                  • #10
                    Good find Brian, thanks for posting it up.

                    Looks like Osmocote may be the secret ingredient
                    I cant think of anything cooler..Oh wait, a T-Rex eating a terradactyl while fighting a giant robot made of ninjas, surrounded by cheer-leaders, a dance squad, and lazers. That would be cooler.

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                    • #11
                      I just received two more rosanervigs last night from Dave and he wrote on the bag "No veining until cooler weather arrives", because it had no veins at all..

                      Pretty sure that's the secret. I trust Dave's knowledge..
                      sigpic


                      Subvert the dominant paradigm!

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                      • #12
                        During the week I was lucky enough to get 3 more of these little gems, all with good veining. I've potted them up differently and hoping that the veining stays. I must thank 2Toned for these plants, first time I've seen pink veins "in the flesh" so to speak.

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                        • #13
                          Good luck, Brian. I've kept the mother plant, which is even pinker than this. They've been grown on my north facing balcony in a 3 footer that gets heaps of direct light all winter, the minimum temp is set at 19C. This would concur with the temp theory.

                          FYI - substrate is DIY... Bunning's propagating sand, B&B, garden soil, marble chips.

                          Cheers
                          Thanks for all the fish!

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