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Flowering Crypts / cryptocoryne inflorescence

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  • Cryptocorynus
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    Is it a crypt or a Lagenandra? Some people call it a missing link between the two - it's Lagenandra keralensis and shares features (not visible in this pic) of both crypts and Lagenandra.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    Oh no, it's getting tricky now...



    C. albida "Costata" from a different accession to our other plant. Dotting to the limb is in much less of a linear pattern and the limb does not twist as much. The curl of the limb may come with age, so it's probably not too diagnostic, but the spread out and non-linear dotting to the limb is definitely making me think these two "Costata" are different.
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 13-12-18, 01:02 PM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    Sometimes even with flowers you can have no idea what's going on! This plant has confused SW and NJ - two of the most knowledgeable crypt experts - for about a month and going. They couldn't work out if it was C. moehlmannii, C. auriculata or something else. Maybe even a hybrid? It was anyone's guess! For a while it looked more like C. auriculata to them and as it wasn't C. yujii like I was told it was when I traded for it we thought that C. cf. auriculata was probably the best label it could have. Now NJ has decided on C. moehlmannii but with an unusual leaf. SW is still sticking with C. auriculata after briefly thinking "C. huluensis" was probable. I think I will need to send a flowering plant to Niels to test pollen fertility (to work out if it is of hybrid origin) and chromosome counts (to narrow down which species fits with whichever chromosome number this plant turns out to have). The chromosome number will give the answer as to which species the plant is as 2n=30 will point to C. moehlmannii and 2n=34 to C. auriculata.



    Here is a pic of the leaf...
    https://imgur.com/dhHP4VI.jpeg

    And brighter so you can see the inside of the collar/throat...
    http://imgur.com/lVBN8US.jpeg

    Some microscope pics didn't even help that much...
    https://imgur.com/EzYKFi1.jpeg
    http://imgur.com/3GYmxnN.jpeg

    And here are another few misc photos from a while back I didn't get around to posting...


    Cryptocoryne crispatula var. balansae


    Cryptocoryne crispatula var. kubotae ("C. tonkinensis")


    Cryptocoryne cordata var. siamensis "Rosanervig"
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 13-12-18, 12:03 PM.

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  • Kennett
    replied


    Today's discovery.. A fruit of C. cordata var. siamensis "Rosanervig".
    Last edited by Kennett; 04-11-18, 11:11 AM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    Posting on Kennett's behalf as he can't seem to attach these...







    A somewhat deformed/under developed C. alba flower.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied

    The Rosanervig wasn't just a one-off as it looks like Cryptocoryne albida "Korthausae" will have seeds pretty soon too! There's not much root so it's anyone's guess if the plant will survive and the seeds will make it to maturity. A friend of mine has guessed springtails pollinated the plant. 08/10/18


    About a week later and the fruit and peduncle have become a much darker colour. I'm feeling hopeful the seeds will be viable and the parent plant will survive. 16/10/18
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 16-10-18, 09:56 AM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    A few more flowers. Both Aquagreen ones this time:






    2010 Aquagreen Cryptocoryne beckettii "Petchii". I'll need to send these photos off to a friend for identification as I'm not sure how to differentiate beckettii from beckettii "Petchii". I'm not sure if its really even possible from the flower?




    And this is one I'm sure Grubs has been hanging out for for ages: Cryptocoryne "retrospiralis" from Aquagreen (aka Cryptocoryne cf. crispatula var. flaccidifolia as it has been known by Grubs and I for a while). However, there is a plot twist in the story. This plant does actually appear to be Cryptocoryne retrospiralis after all! Although the limb is dotted (as per retrospiralis), I was under the impression the dots were not evenly spread enough to be retrospiralis... but that is not the case. The kettle also appears to point to retrospiralis from the constriction and the alveoli (small white dimples near the male part of the flower).

    These photos have been run past my good friend Suwidji Wongso who has wrote many papers on Cryptocoryne; Karen Randall who has observed the plants in situ; and also Fazal Babu, another friend of mine into crypts and who lives in India (where C. retrospiralis is native). They are all in agreement that this plant is C. retrospiralis. Additionally, Karen Randall made a comment that the leaves of this form are much more broad than all other forms of C. retrospiralis she is familiar with.

    Some microscope pics...


    Limb appears more dotted on second examination than I originally thought. There are some (debatable) lines like is the case with crispatula but that appears to just be the case of an atypical limb of C. retrospiralis as the lines appear to still be made up of noticeable dots.


    The kettle, while a bit mangled, shows the alveoli well. These are the white dots on the cut away section of the kettle wall - this is seen in C. retrospiralis, and from what I have found, also crispatula. The kettle is also constricted in the middle which is known to occur in retrospiralis.


    Dentate leaf margins? While not dentate in the normal sense of the word (spiked as per the crispatula group - including albida) these clear windows at the leaf margin appear to point to C. retrospiralis so I've been told.
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 23-02-19, 08:36 AM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    Thanks, Grubs! The "Costata" I am assuming is the Aquagreen form, I don't think it's an imported one. I got it from Damien a fair while back. I compared it to yours and the flower seems a little different. It didn't seem like yours had much of a limb at all. But considering the difference in your emersed plant and mine, I'd say the conditions may be a factor - this "Costata" was bright red and marmorated inside under artificial light earlier on so maybe the flower is also dependent somewhat on humidity or light? And thanks Rebel, will be sure to try this on the next couple of shots. I think a while back BrianS was using a stacking programme to achieve a better depth of field, have you got any experience using anything similar?
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 13-08-18, 06:32 PM.

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  • Rebel
    replied
    Really nice light quality and colours. My suggestion is for you to use the hyperfocal distance, increase the F stop further 13 or more and use a tripod so that depth of field is increased for the next set of shots.

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  • Grubs
    replied
    Very nice crypto. Those plants are looking really lush and its a great comparison between "Korthausae" and "Costata". My Korthausae (Aquagreen) has only flowered once and I missed it completely. Is that Costata the Dennerle variety?

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied




    C. albida "Costata" is flowering now and the differences between it and "Korthausae" are clear. C. albida "Costata" has beautiful red petioles when in the same conditions as C. albida "Korthausae". The edges of the limb of the spathe are also a much lighter colour.




    This is Aquagreen "C. balansae" and is a more tricky one. It seems to be about half way between Cryptocoryne crispatula var. crispatula and var. balansae going off the limb and (immature?) kettle. Haven't decided on this one yet...
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 12-08-18, 09:07 AM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied






    A triple spathe on C. albida "Korthausae" today. It's amazing how different plants can sync up their flowering.
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 31-07-18, 08:02 PM.

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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied
    Stunning, Grubs! When comparing it to "Blassii" it would appear a little different. Every "Blassii" flower I've had has been completely yellow. Not even when it was grown in a red soil which would have been brimming with iron did it show any red. Looks like the flower as a whole is a little more orange than "Blassii" too. Super healthy plant, I'm very jealous!

    Maybe we're just seeing differences between emersed and submersed flowers? Or maybe mine opened earlier than it would have otherwise due to the damage?

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  • Grubs
    replied
    C. cordata var. siamensis "evae" emersed jar culture

    Originally posted by Cryptocorynus View Post
    C. cordata var. siamensis "evae" submersed, 20/04/18.
    Mine has a little more red-brown on the outer edge of the limb. Spathe is not quite open fully.





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  • Cryptocorynus
    replied


    A double spathe of Cryptocoryne usteriana from a long-time Cryptocoryne grower in North Queensland. This plant is descended from an import into Aus in the 70s. Most plants that were here in collections prior to a few years ago when Dennerle TC cups started to be brought in are probably descended from the plants of this initial import and will be the same as this plant photographed here.

    And yes, the inside of the limb is out of focus - something to correct next time. Photographing these little flowers is a lot more difficult than it may seem!
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 15-07-18, 07:45 PM.

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