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Australatya striolata Riffle shrimp

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  • Australatya striolata Riffle shrimp


    Photo thanks to unissuh

    Name:
    Scientific: Australatya striolata
    Common: Riffle shrimp


    Temp: 18 20c

    ................................Average..Lowest...Highest
    Water Temperature...19.2.........17.0.......20.3
    pH............................6.6...........6.2..... ...7.2
    Water Flow...............MEDIUM
    Turbidity...................LOW
    Total Hardness..........VERY SOFT (44 ppm)
    Carbonate Hardness...VERY SOFT (0 ppm)
    Information thanks to ANGFA
    http://db.angfa.org.au/display.php?tbl=animals&id=180

    Interbreeds:
    They are capable of predating on baby shrimp of other species and fish eggs. They are able to be kept with CRS, chameleons, DAS, Caradina typus, providing their predation on shrimplets is not an issue.

    Available from: Dave, Aquagreen

    Food: They are filter feeders, extracting particles from the water with their "fans" - they need moving water to do this, which is why they are often in front of filter outlets.

    Size: 4-7cm

    They require water flow in the tank, and will often sit in front of filter outlets, as they are filter feeders.

    In the wild they live in medium to fast running creeks.

    They can change colour according to mood & environment.

    They change gender as they age, transforming from male to female as they mature. If you want to breed them, it is therefore advisable to have 2 different sizes.


    Relevant threads:
    Will eat baby CRS:
    http://www.aquariumlife.com.au/showt...ghlight=riffle
    Eating fish eggs:
    http://www.aquariumlife.com.au/showt...ghlight=riffle
    Compatability & info on keeping:
    http://www.aquariumlife.com.au/showt...ghlight=riffle

    • DiscusEden
      #1
      DiscusEden commented
      Editing a comment
      Truly spectacular, detailed photos thanks to Watfish:
      http://www.aquariumlife.com.au/showt...-Riffle-Shrimp

    • Aubrey
      #2
      Aubrey commented
      Editing a comment
      This species in nationally threatened and may require a transport/keeping permit in some jurisdictions. For example, in the ACT it is listed under the Nature Conservation Act 1980, s 17 Schedule 1 as a Protected Invertebrate and requires a permit.

    • Grubs
      #3
      Grubs commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Aubrey
      This species in nationally threatened
      Australatya striolata is not listed as nationally threatened by the EPBC Act.

      Australatya striolata is protected in the ACT by the Nature Conservation Act, and in Victoria by the Fauna and Flora Guarantee Act. This is due to rarity in those states because only fringes of the species natural range crosses into these states, not because the species is nationally rare. In Victoria you need a permit to collect them from the wild. You DO NOT require a permit in Victoria if your shrimp were legally obtained from an aquarium shop or licensed aquaculture facility (Vic Gov. Order in Council 1/2009).

      In NSW and QLD Australatya striolata is relatively common and is not subject to legislative protection.
      Last edited by Grubs; 17-03-14, 09:07 AM.
    Posting comments is disabled.

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    Photo thanks to unissuh

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    Common: Riffle shrimp


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    Water Flow...............MEDIUM
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