Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 20 of 20

Thread: What are your ways to keep your tanks cool?

  1. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pseudechisbutleri View Post


    I don't think the grass would be too happy with salt, plus it's on a slope with a drain at the bottom.
    Grass will survive 1 or 2 water changes, then they'll straight up die (from experience) haha.

  2. #17

    Default

    What are you keeping in your marine tank anyway?

    May be you can look at more effective nutrient transport routes - a good light ontop of some chaeto or GFO+ carbon reactor can really bring down nitrates and phosphates, eliminating the need for water changes entirely. Considering your method of doseing is fine tuned. If doing this method, water changes are pretty much for detritus removal so once a month or even longer would be fine depending on how effective your flow is around the tank at pushing detritus into your filter socks

  3. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    One method of keeping containers about 20 degrees below ambient has been to use styrofoam containers (about 2cm thickness) with a fan over it while the room was less than 50% humidity. I managed to keep one at 18 degrees despite 38 degree heat outside. Just need to top off the daily evaporation which quite alot.

    If you insulate all around the tank apart from the top, I think you could achieve similar efficiency with a simple fan, provided you have lowish humidity.
    Just realised I have a big fan sitting on my desk, should've used it on those hot days.... at least I know now

    Also just realised I have a big sheet of styrofoam, I'll cut that thing to size and get it up on the sides of the tank on the next extra hot day.

    I don't think I'd have any problems keeping my tanks at ideal temperatures if I were to move them indoors. It's relatively cool in the more spacious rooms, especially with the AC turned on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of Destruction View Post
    What are you keeping in your marine tank anyway?

    May be you can look at more effective nutrient transport routes - a good light ontop of some chaeto or GFO+ carbon reactor can really bring down nitrates and phosphates, eliminating the need for water changes entirely. Considering your method of doseing is fine tuned. If doing this method, water changes are pretty much for detritus removal so once a month or even longer would be fine depending on how effective your flow is around the tank at pushing detritus into your filter socks
    I have three marine tanks:

    The 8L contains a couple pocillopora frags (which aren't looking so hot tbh), a singly shrimp and mangrove propagule.

    The 20L contains just a single scorpionfish and some sand. Live rock is curing in a separate bucket, and the fish's bioload is handled with large weekly water changes.

    The 120L contains a few pieces of live rock (gonna add that live rock once it cures), Xenia coral, some mangrove propagules, a few pistol shrimp and a single goby.

    I'm a fan of the KISS concept, and all those tanks rely on the three bare necessities of reef tanks: light, flow and heat. Large weekly water changes are performed, and I dose magnesium infrequently for the mangroves. No sump btw . I've never had any complications with the water quality that water changes couldn't handle. I might implement a refugium at some point. Basically, I'm going low tech/high maintenance, instead of hi tech/no maintenance, which can be achieved with reactors, skimmers, GFO, etc

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    13,731

    Default

    btw I used these on the styro container.


  5. #20

    Default

    Hey, that one looks exactly like mine.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •