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Thread: Is one flouro tube enough?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    South Australia, Adelaide
    Posts
    43

    Default Is one flouro tube enough?

    I just bought a 153cm x 50cm x 50cm tank and it came with most everything.

    I want to put peaceful South American cichlids and rainbowfish in it.

    Problem is the Aqua Nova light that came with it (correct length) is a one flouro light and to me it just doesn't feel right. Doesn't feel like enough light.

    Am I right to think this? If I should get better, what would be the cheapest to get to replace it?

    Any help appreciated

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
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    13,739

    Default

    What plants are you planning on? Any examples of what tank you might want to replicate?

    For fish only, that light would be enough but still dim to the eye, although may improve if you replace the tube with a new one.

  3. #3

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    One light is sufficient if you only want fish or floating plants. However, if you want to grow plants in the gravel you will need at least 3 x fluorescent globes that are 36watts or more. On a big tank like yours it would probably be cheaper to get a couple of 150watt LED spotlights (with a 6500k globe) from a hardware store and hang them above the tank.

    If you want fluorescent lights, don't waste your time trying to find 5 foot fluorescent globes because they are rare and expensive. Get a couple of twin fluorescent light units that are 4 foot long and use daylight globes with a 6500K rating. You can get them from any hardware and get an electrician to wire them up to a cord with a switch.

    -----------------------
    Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

    In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning one tank light on. Wait an hour before turning another light on, and so on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

    At night turn one tank light off and wait an hour. Then turn the room light on and then turn the last tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

    Timers are useful if you have multiple lights on an aquarium and you have can them set to come on and off 1 hour apart so you get a bit of light and then an hour later more light. At night the timers go off an hour apart and the tank slowly gets darker.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    South Australia, Adelaide
    Posts
    43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin_T View Post
    On a big tank like yours it would probably be cheaper to get a couple of 150watt LED spotlights (with a 6500k globe) from a hardware store and hang them above the tank.
    I actually didn't know you could do that, I like the idea. Would normal led spotlights like you say work for plants in the substrate?

    ?
    Last edited by belveder; 06-11-18 at 12:04 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Yes the normal floodlights/ spotlights work but they need the wattage and the kelvin rating (5500K to 6500K). Bunnings use to sell 10. 20, 50, 100 & 150watt LED spotlights that had cords and plugs and mounting brackets and you simply bolted them to a frame above the tank. However, I just checked their website and they don't have any on it but they might still carry them or be able to get them in. If not check out the lighting stores in your area and see what they have.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    South Australia, Adelaide
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Thanks a lot for that

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