Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: I seek knowledge!

  1. #1

    Default I seek knowledge!

    I was wondering, who here fills up their tank with filtered tap water? In the past I've used buckets and the kitchen tap to fill up, which is filtered.
    My new setup (WIP) has a feed directly from an outside tap through the wall (Also used to drain water outside). Should I bother getting a filter for the incoming line?

    I also think I've decided on inert matt black gravel as substrate for my planted tank from Kellyville pets, it's $53/10KG but it's still way cheaper than the black soil. Will using root tabs be sufficient for a planted tank given I'm also going to use a new LED light from MML and a co2 bottle? I've read some people have success with normal gravel - the nutrient loaded stuff seems either way too expensive or complicated. My tank is 190L so it needs a fair bit of it.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    43

    Default

    My tank is 165L and only need 2x9L ADA Amazonia soil for approx 1.5”; that cost around $55 each from LFS, maybe cheaper online

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Perth WA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    I think Cwang there is a few things that you need to take into consideration before deciding on whether to go filtered or not.
    First would be what the parameters of the tap water is. Particularly PH and TDS.
    Secondly, what type of stock you plan on keeping in the tank. Plants will thrive in most water unless the parameters are extreme.

  4. #4

    Default

    Your tap water quality parameters will determine whether a chemical filter on the water, or aging in a barrel is needed. My tap water in the estern suburbs of Melbourne is generally low TDS and near neutral pH with low amounts of chlorine (not chloramine) and I often put the garden hose in the tank without filtering. I also use rain water the same way..but harden the water with a few spoons of booster as it goes in. Dont assume what is good for someone else is good for you. You need to test your water and I would also find out from your water authority how your water is treated (chlorine vs chloramine).

    I mostly use gravel but $53 for 10kg seems "up there" for price. Also be careful that your matt black gravel is not the one sold as "Midnight" in Victoria which is brilliant for hard water species because it does raise GH and pH considerably (ie its not inert... not by a long shot). I use it in my tanks to buffer very acidic rainwater but it might be less suitable if your tap water is already alkalnie. I would ask your LFS for a handful to test in a glass of water for a few days - do water tests of the glass before and after to decide if its really inert. Plenty of people grow great plants in gravel. I like to stir a little red clay (laterite) through my gravel which can make a mess...but good for the plants. DinoDung from Aquagreen is also a good way to put a little clay down into your gravel.

    Use the forum search and read a lot.... these questions get asked and aswered all the time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    13,151

    Default

    Is this regular Sydney water?

    If so, just fill from tap and add dechlorinator to the tank. I wouldn't bother with anything else.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    Is this regular Sydney water?

    If so, just fill from tap and add dechlorinator to the tank. I wouldn't bother with anything else.
    I don't even add dechlorinator if my tank is fully planted

  7. #7

    Default

    I reckon the trick to inert substrates is to dose fertilisers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    13,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of Destruction View Post
    I don't even add dechlorinator if my tank is fully planted
    :P

    This advice is not suitable for beginners.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    :P

    This advice is not suitable for beginners.
    He's right, don't do it

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    13,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of Destruction View Post
    I reckon the trick to inert substrates is to dose fertilisers
    Very regularly also.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madmerv View Post
    I think Cwang there is a few things that you need to take into consideration before deciding on whether to go filtered or not.
    First would be what the parameters of the tap water is. Particularly PH and TDS.
    Secondly, what type of stock you plan on keeping in the tank. Plants will thrive in most water unless the parameters are extreme.
    I'll take some readings before and after filter, I've got an aquarium ph tester and a TDS tester at work. Should be interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grubs View Post
    I would also find out from your water authority how your water is treated (chlorine vs chloramine).
    Sydney water uses Chlorine. I'll get testing!

    Quote Originally Posted by Grubs View Post
    I mostly use gravel but $53 for 10kg seems "up there" for price. Also be careful that your matt black gravel is not the one sold as "Midnight" in Victoria which is brilliant for hard water species because it does raise GH and pH considerably (ie its not inert... not by a long shot). I use it in my tanks to buffer very acidic rainwater but it might be less suitable if your tap water is already alkalnie. I would ask your LFS for a handful to test in a glass of water for a few days - do water tests of the glass before and after to decide if its really inert. Plenty of people grow great plants in gravel. I like to stir a little red clay (laterite) through my gravel which can make a mess...but good for the plants. DinoDung from Aquagreen is also a good way to put a little clay down into your gravel.

    Use the forum search and read a lot.... these questions get asked and aswered all the time.
    I agree it's expensive. I've done more reading and found I'll probably get Carib Sea Eco Complete Black, it comes in 9KG bags and is less than $50 each. Apparently it doesn't break down like the proper aqua soils do. I like the natural colour and it believe it, whilst almost inert, can store nutrients from the water column. (I'm sure there's a 3 letter acronym for that) I think combined with column and root ferts it may be the way forward for me.
    It's funny, for people like me who are experienced with fish but not with plants, there really is quite a steep learning curve. There are so many ways to do things, every member online has a different opinion and system

    I've tried visiting this forum but keep getting malware messages....the site has been hacked or something.
    Last edited by Cwang; 09-08-18 at 08:40 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Perth WA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cwang View Post
    I'll take some readings before and after filter, I've got an aquarium ph tester and a TDS tester at work. Should be interesting.


    I've tried visiting this forum but keep getting malware messages....the site has been hacked or something.
    The site has not been hacked it is just some programs pick that up. Tell your program to allow this site.
    I will expand a bit on what i said.
    Most people run a filtered water so they can meet the exact requirements of a particular species of shrimp or fish. Using a RODI unit will give you a 0's on almost all parameters so GH and KH boosters are added along with using a buffering substrate to try and replicate the stocks natural environment. Every WC the water has to be adjusted to exactly where you want it before adding to the tank.
    Most popular aquarium fish, and a few of the shrimp, can tolerate a pretty wide variety of parameters and unless you have a major extreme, PH above 8 or below 6, TDS off the charts, etc, then it is much easier to just go with un filtered water and let the stock adjust. Neutralizing the chlorines, with something like Prime, and ensuring there is nothing leaching into the tank water is usually enough. It also makes doing a WC a lot easier.
    Now if you want to keep, and breed, soft water fish or some of the shrimp species then RO water is almost a must have.
    A lot of people on here will agree that having a stable environment in the tank is far more important than having the exact parameters.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •