Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Whats up with this little guy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballarat
    Posts
    99

    Default Whats up with this little guy

    Hi All

    So I've had these spotted blue eyes cruzing along in the tank for a couple of weeks now, I started to notice the smallest male (3m 2f) getting a little unhappy and not like his usual self (noticed it friday) he was always small but used to be fiesty.

    Last couple of days he looked unwell, fins all in etc but he was still eating and grabbing food, although today he looks much worse is hiding alot more and isnt interested in food, the 2nd male has started getting his fins all flat as well.



    Any ideas whats up with the little guy?

    I've checked the water params, no ammonia, nitrite and only 5-10 ppm nitrates. The ph is up at about 7.6 (normally it was about 6.8) which is higher than it used to be I've just checked the tap and the storage bucket (I add water conditioner in a 30 L drum and it sits outside for a week or more) and both had ph up above 8.8 so something is up with my water supply atm. Other tank mates are a bunch of native shrimp and 2 male guppies (who mostly chase each other around haven't seen them have a go at the other fish

    Thanks

    Matt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    Hi Matt, you should only add the water conditioner just before you add to the tank. You can of course leave it outside for one week if you wish.

    Can't really help with the shrunk looking tummy on this one. Hope the little guy pulls through. Can you catch it and chuck it in Quarantine?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballarat
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Thanks Rebel, I never knew that. Thought that I should condition the water as soon as I get it ready not let it age for a week then condition. Will keep that in mind and may add some condition to the tank now as it has a stress coat in it.

    Apart from the tummy his fins aren't coming out at all. I dont have a seperate Quarantine tank and the fluval edge were he lives is a impossible to attach a breeder box or something to, thats if I could catch the little guy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    Hi Matt, yes the conditioners usually render chlorine etc harmless for 24 hours only. The filter is supposed to remove it before it's an issue. Aging water is feasible if you only have chlorine but nor chloramine which lasts in the water for upto 6 months.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    Hi Matt, yes the conditioners usually render chlorine etc harmless for 24 hours only. The filter is supposed to remove it before it's an issue. Aging water is feasible if you only have chlorine but nor chloramine which lasts in the water for upto 6 months.
    That's not quite right.

    Most (all?) dechlorinators will remove chlorine almost instantly and permanently.

    The issue with Chloramine is that it dissociates into ammonium and chloride ions in water. Dechlorinators will strip away the chloride permanently leaving the ammonium which can spike and become toxic.

    Some - but not all "conditioners" will try to also lock away the ammonia. Seachem Prime (for example) will render the ammonia less toxic for a temporary period 24-48 hours where its hoped that the filter consumes it (the less harmful form is purported to be more readily broken down in the filter). After 24-48 hours residual ammonia can be re-released so you can still have a delayed toxic spike but in practice I don't think its very common (or maybe few people test for it).

    You can often look up your water suppliers website to see if they use chlorine or chloramine - if the latter make sure you buy the right dechlorinator.

    Edit - regarding the little blue-eye - sometimes you just get a "dud" and its not your fault. Little fish with short lifespans are not the most robust species. That said its always worth double-checking your husbandry is up to snuff.
    Last edited by Grubs; 12-02-18 at 08:34 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    Hi Grubs, I stand corrected!

    I was getting confused on the locking away ammonia issue!

    https://web.archive.org/web/20160305...ine-chloramine

  7. #7

    Default

    Good link Rebel - "In a planted aquarium NH3/NH4 would be rapidly scavenged by the plants."

    +1 for plants!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballarat
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Thanks guys for the info I’ve learnt something new about water conditioner and think I should stop using the stuff that’s about 4years old and go get some new stuff just to be sure. The stuff I have is nitration aqua plus it removes both chlorine and chloramine.

    Re the fish he’s from Dave at aquagreen so good stock and for at least 10 days (or more) was a feisty little fella chasing the ladies and food, and not too intimidated by the bigger male. So I doubt he’s just got bad genes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    Matt, I also acquired 6 of these fish and one of em looks like this!!! I will try to photograph if he lives.

    Edit: Mine are Threadfin rainbows rather than the blue eyes.
    Last edited by Rebel; 12-02-18 at 10:44 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballarat
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Cheers thanks Rebel. This guy had been doing well for nearly 2 weeks before he started looking like this. On Saturday while he looked like this he was still hunting the frozen baby brine I have been feeding them.

    I did go buy some fresh water conditioner (API stress coat) and have dosed to hopefully help.

  11. #11

    Default

    Hi Matt

    I'm not sure if your Pseudomugil gertrudae is still alive, but it has a muscle wasting disease caused by protozoans in the muscle tissue. It happens to shellfish too (marron, yabbies, etc). It is sometimes seen in fish, usually native fish.

    I have had some success treating this by adding sea salt, rock salt or swimming pool salt. If you live near the beach you can use seawater. Basically you get the tank to half strength seawater and keep it there for two to four weeks (2 weeks minimum but 4 weeks is preferred). After that time you do small (10%) daily water changes to dilute the salt.

    The problem with this level of salt is it kills plants and some freshwater fishes like Corydoras. Rainbows are normally fine in it tho for this length of time. If they spend too long in high levels of salt it can stuff up their kidneys, so 4 weeks is maximum for half strength seawater.

    -----------------------
    re: ageing water for the aquarium. I use to fill up my water holding containers, add conditioner and then aerate vigorously for a week before using it. I needed to do this because Perth tap water is really toxic. We had more than 7 times the safe recommended level of chlorine in the tap water (water corp tested it). The more time dechlorinators are in the tap water, the more time they have to come in contact with all the chlorine and break it down. Water movement helps this process and surface turbulence helps get rid of chlorine from the water. Having said this, putting a bucket of tap water out in the sun for a few days will remove chlorine too. The U/V light breaks down the chlorine. Just aerating water for a week will also remove chlorine.

    However, if you have chloramine in the water, then you need a dechlorinator that breaks down chloramine into chlorine and ammonia.

    Dechlorinators are designed for people who don't have facilities to hold water for a week so the chlorine can come out naturally. In these circumstances it is best to add dechlorinator to a bucket/s of tap water, aerate for at least 2 minutes, and then add the water to the tank.
    Last edited by Colin_T; 18-02-18 at 06:34 PM. Reason: edited coz I got *** when I wrote tap water as one word.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ballarat
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Thanks for the info Colin, unfortunately this little guy and another didnt make it but all other fish are happy and health.

    Good info about the aging of water and I forgot about aeration.

    The dechlorinator covers both chloramine and chlorine, will have to ask the local pet shop (no aquariums locally anymore ) if they what is used int he water here.

    Thanks for your help everyone

  13. #13

    Default

    if you contact your water corporation they should be able to tell you what is meant to be in the water. Check their website and email them.

    One way of checking for chloramine is to do an ammonia test on some tap water. There should not be any. Then add a couple of drops of dechlorinator to break down any chlorine or chlorine bonded ammonia, and retest for ammonia. If you get an ammonia reading after you add dechlorinator, then there is chloramine in the water.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin_T View Post

    One way of checking for chloramine is to do an ammonia test on some tap water. There should not be any. Then add a couple of drops of dechlorinator to break down any chlorine or chlorine bonded ammonia, and retest for ammonia. If you get an ammonia reading after you add dechlorinator, then there is chloramine in the water.
    This is not at all a bad idea! I might try it with my water which only has Chlorine.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •