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Thread: camallanus treatment

  1. #16
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    Does it matter more if the fish is constantly eating the substrate like guppies, goldies etc?

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    Does it matter more if the fish is constantly eating the substrate like guppies, goldies etc?
    Some fish do seem to get it more (livebearers etc) whereas for example tetras rarely and in catfish it would be really difficult to detect. Female guppies are really good as sentinel fish ie they show the worms better than other fish.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noddy65 View Post
    Most camallanus species require an intermediate host to be passed on, usually a crustacean. Although there is at least one species that can directly reinfect the fish. Therefor siphoning the bodies is probably not really necessary (unless you've got eh one species where it does matter)
    Well, you wouldn't want to risk it. There are some nasty, resistant strains out there and given that it take months to have certainty of cure, you want to do the whole shebang. What would really be good is a PCR test to test the water, might be a market niche internationally. especially pet shops could check batches before they infect their floor stock.

  4. #19

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    Camallanus worms are spread by fish eating fish poop.

    Digenetic trematode worms are the ones with multi host life cycles.

  5. #20
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    I am somewhat sure that my endlers have that poop-eater behaviour. They seem to sift through the sand at times.

  6. #21
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  7. #22
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    hahahaha.. Love the meme!!

    I love it when you guys pop onto my thread and have these high end discussions. It is so educational. I've spoken with my top fish store people today and have been advised not to worry about worm treatment. They don't believe it is worms being the issue. They suggested a little aquarium salt, small water changes every couple of days and some more melafix, substrate change over incase substrate is infected with anything. Suggested to take some out of one of my larger tanks with good bio in it and use that. Its only a 20L tank I am working with for these changes. Here's hoping by doing this my siamese fighter will perk up again.

    https://scontent-syd2-1.xx.fbcdn.net...f3&oe=5B0ED3DA


    For those who have facebook. I have an album for my fish tagged us public. The photos go from older to newer... https://www.facebook.com/sharynl.ben...7845226&type=3

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by little_tigress View Post
    My sick fishy symptoms are:
    arched back; lethargy; not eating; coming up for air but not food; swimming haphazardly when they do; not responding to melafix or multicure; white to clear stringy poo; eventually death.

    I have never treated for worms so I figured maybe now is a good time to begin doing so on a regular basis as a standard maintenance. once a year or however regular it should be done.
    Your fish have TB (tuberculosis) or another form of internal bacterial infection.
    TB are a slow growing bacterium that invades a cell in the body of the fish. Over time (6-12months, sometimes more) the bacteria build up and eventually cause organ failure. The fish normally bloat up, stop eating, do stringy white poop and die. There is no cure for fish when this happens.

    If you lose one fish every now and then to these symptoms then it is most likely TB. If you lose a large number of fish to these symptoms but in a short space of time (eg: 1 week) then it is another form of internal bacterial or protozoan infection. The TB can't be treated but in cases where you lose a lot of fish in a few days then medicated food can sometimes help. You would have to track down a source of fish food that has anti-biotics in. The commonly available medicated food is designed to treat goldfish ulcer disease.

    -----------------------
    re: internal worms in fish. Camallanus and Capillaria (round or thread worms) are readily seen hanging out of a fish's bum and look like thin white or red (normally red from the blood they drink) worms sticking out a couple of mm of the fish's butt. Tapeworms (segmented worms) in fish do not normally stick out.
    Praziquantel is used to treat tapeworm in cats & dogs and works on fish too. However, it does nothing to thread worms. Levamisole is recommended for them.

    Worm infections in fish will normally cause the fish to lose weight and look skinny. However, if a fish is very heavily infested with worms, the fish will actually look fat like a pregnant guppy or molly. Worms do not normally kill fish quickly if at all. It is not in the best interests of the worms to kill their host because if the host fish dies, the parasites (worms) die.

    Having said all this most fish bought from aquarium shops have worms and either have TB or have been exposed to TB in the tanks at the shop, wholesaler or fish farms. Worms and TB are extremely common and virtually every aquarium shop in the world has it in their tanks.

    Aquariums are a soup of micro-organism including bacteria, protozoans, fungus, viruses and other things. Aquarium fish are pretty tough considering what they live in.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin_T View Post
    Your fish have TB (tuberculosis) or another form of internal bacterial infection.
    TB are a slow growing bacterium that invades a cell in the body of the fish. Over time (6-12months, sometimes more) the bacteria build up and eventually cause organ failure. The fish normally bloat up, stop eating, do stringy white poop and die. There is no cure for fish when this happens.

    If you lose one fish every now and then to these symptoms then it is most likely TB. If you lose a large number of fish to these symptoms but in a short space of time (eg: 1 week) then it is another form of internal bacterial or protozoan infection. The TB can't be treated but in cases where you lose a lot of fish in a few days then medicated food can sometimes help. You would have to track down a source of fish food that has anti-biotics in. The commonly available medicated food is designed to treat goldfish ulcer disease.

    -----------------------
    re: internal worms in fish. Camallanus and Capillaria (round or thread worms) are readily seen hanging out of a fish's bum and look like thin white or red (normally red from the blood they drink) worms sticking out a couple of mm of the fish's butt. Tapeworms (segmented worms) in fish do not normally stick out.
    Praziquantel is used to treat tapeworm in cats & dogs and works on fish too. However, it does nothing to thread worms. Levamisole is recommended for them.

    Worm infections in fish will normally cause the fish to lose weight and look skinny. However, if a fish is very heavily infested with worms, the fish will actually look fat like a pregnant guppy or molly. Worms do not normally kill fish quickly if at all. It is not in the best interests of the worms to kill their host because if the host fish dies, the parasites (worms) die.

    Having said all this most fish bought from aquarium shops have worms and either have TB or have been exposed to TB in the tanks at the shop, wholesaler or fish farms. Worms and TB are extremely common and virtually every aquarium shop in the world has it in their tanks.

    Aquariums are a soup of micro-organism including bacteria, protozoans, fungus, viruses and other things. Aquarium fish are pretty tough considering what they live in.
    That sounds awfully easy but it's not. I can say for a fact that nematodes are not always readily seen hanging out of a fish's bum. If you have a heavy infestation in the right fish, yes. A single one in a male guppy, difficult. A catfish, very difficult. And they don't always hang out. I had a macmasteri wasting away, no worms visible. With Kusuri, readily visible, I didn't expect it since I am on the lookout for camallanus constantly. Just used Kusuri on the off chance it might be a tapeworm or something.

  10. #25
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    My siamese fighter is still hanging in there. swimming only when he has to. not eating.

    Well... The fact that it has now been since Australia Day I would have thought that not eating that whole time would have caused the fish to weaken further, deteriorate in condition and pass away.. But no..

    To look at he is just a lazy fish all of a sudden. At least he is swimming straight and not on his side since the first treatment weeks ago. Surely he must be eating to be still alive.

    Apart from just sitting around on the substrate he looks healthy enough but seems to have lost total interest in everything and startles easy. I continue to drop a few pellets in there for him every day on the off chance he wants to eat or eats when we are not around.

  11. #26

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    Unlike mammals and most terrestrial animals, fish don't need to eat to stay warm. With mammals and birds, etc, we eat food to keep our body temperatures stabile and to grow and move about. Most of what we eat is simply used to keep us warm. Fish on the other hand, take their body temperature from the surrounding water. This means the food they eat is used to grow and move about. A well fed fish can go for weeks or even months without eating purely because they do not need the food to keep warm.

    Make sure you remove any uneaten food from the tank so it doesn't pollute the water.

  12. #27
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    Thank you Colin.

    I have 3 small bristlenose catfish in his tank so thankfully any food leftover is eaten up by them. I was not aware they could survive for months without eating. I sure hope he perks up and begins to eat again. I miss his inquisitive nature.

  13. #28
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    Hi guys sorry to bring up an old thread. I've definitely have Camallanus infection in my tank and so far it has taken about of my fish as far as I know (2 rainbows, 2 aqassizi cichlids, and 2 angels) over the course of about 6 months. Effective treatments I've read is so far impractical for my established planted tank, especially the total substrate vaccuming. I can source the levamisole for the de-worming, but I think short of stripping down my tank and bleach-bombing it and start over, I don't think I can ever get rid of the problem completely.

    So now I got 2 questions :
    1. What can I do (realistically without tearing down my tank) to minimise the risk of the rest of my fish getting infected by these buggers?
    2. Does healthy fish have higher resistance to Callamanus? If the worms are in my tank for months already, that means most likely all of my fish are carriers. Why then I only get deaths one at a time and spaced out, rather than a huge outbreak and mass-death? Is it maybe the worms wait inside the fish's bodies and wait for an opportune moment (ie. drop in general health) and then it breaks out?

    Thanks
    __________________________________________________ _____
    Riz

  14. #29

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    If one fish in your tank has worms, they all have worms.

    You need to treat all your tanks at the same time. Then retreat the tanks a week later and a week after that. Three treatments in total, one week between treatments.

    If you are feeding live food to the fish that can introduce it. Daphnia, blackworms & Tubifex worms readily transmit threadworms to fish.

    It is pointless stripping the tanks down because the fish will still be carrying the worms. Most fish will not be reinfected with the worms that are expelled, but they usually have eggs in their intestine that hatch. This is why you need to treat them 3 times, over a 3 week period. Corydoras might pick up some of the expelled worms but it depends on what medication you used to treat the worms. Some medications actually kill the worms whereas levamisole paralyses the worms so they can be expelled.
    If the worms spend a few days out of the fish they usually die from lack of food.

    Healthy fish that are well fed can tolerate worms for a bit longer but it depends on how many worms are in the fish. One worm won't affect a fish but 100 worms will quickly suck the blood out of the fish and the fish dies from low blood pressure and anaemia.

  15. #30
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    There is always this debate whether levamisole just paralyzes or actually kills the worms. In my experience it does kill if you use a high enough dose and this may be higher than what is commonly stated on the the net. Nematocidal doses are reported by Charles Harrison on the web. He deals with killifish in USA (Imkr). I use higher doses. One pet shop owner uses Levamisole first and then another agent, the name of which I have forgotten. he believes that Levamisole only paralyses and then follows up with something else to kill the nematodes. I'll try to find out the details.
    Some fish seem to be more affected than others. Fish that pick for food on the ground seem to have it more. I reckon it would be very hard to detect it in catfish. Within a species some fish are more affected than others often.
    As far as practical solutions: Vacuum as much gravel as is practically possible, otherwise move all your fish into a tank that is easier to treat and leave the original tank uninhabited. Nobody can say though how long it would take for the original tank to be nematode free but I reckon 3 months would certainly do it. You will need to treat all your fish at least twice, better 3x as Colin suggested and you will have casualties from treatment, likely the agasizzi.

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