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Thread: Housing size for reacotr

  1. #1
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    Default Housing size for reacotr

    Hi all,

    I will be attempting to make a all in one inline heater and reactor shortly. I have tried searching this site for info and have everything i need except the answer to one question.

    The only thing i am still unsure of is the size of the reactor casing. What exactly dictates the sweet spot for size of the reactor you can use? What factor is more imporant, height, width or both?

    Reason i am asking is that i was looking at getting a 20" * 4.5" housing but these things go for $120+ and at that price sort of takes away from the cost saving DIY path. The 10" * 2.5" housings are around $40, Im just not sure if a reactor housing of this size on a 450L tank will be suitable

    If not would a 10" * 4.5" be ok?

  2. #2
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    sorry i forgot to add, is a pressure release valve required or handy? cheers

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrKrabs View Post
    sorry i forgot to add, is a pressure release valve required or handy? cheers
    No. There should be no pressure.

  6. #6

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    Diffusion of CO2 is more a function of flow and turbulence - not reactor size. A good reactor that is 100% efficient can be smaller than your forearm. Making one as big as a house doesn't change the fact that its already 100% efficient... it just takes up more space in the cupboard.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrKrabs View Post
    all in one inline heater and reactor
    Bear in mind that if you raise the CO2 injection too high accidentally, or experience end-of-tank-dump, or the regulator fails you can fill the reactor with CO2 gas and you'll be leaving your heater high and dry... use heaters that are cheap to replace or that have a thermal cut-off. The risk is small - as an example for me would be 3 occasions in last 10 years. 1 failed reg. 1 knocked the needle control messing in the cupboard, and 1 end of tank dump.

  8. #8
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    I would suggest staying away from all in one CO2 and heater as well. Curious to see any custom design you can come up with though.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grubs View Post
    Diffusion of CO2 is more a function of flow and turbulence - not reactor size. A good reactor that is 100% efficient can be smaller than your forearm. Making one as big as a house doesn't change the fact that its already 100% efficient... it just takes up more space in the cupboard.
    thanks Grubs. In you opinion, what is the best way to create more turbulance? would adding say a coarse foam pad and/or bioballs to the reactor be wise?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    I would suggest staying away from all in one CO2 and heater as well. Curious to see any custom design you can come up with though.
    Nah wont be a custom design mate, i found this picture on the net. Not sure if i can post links to other sites but if not let me know and will take it down.

    http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/20...ne-heater.html

    Grubs would this avoid the issues with raising CO2 injection you mentioned above? I ask cos the inline heater isnt in the reactor itself but joined to it. Maybe my choice of words wasnt right in calling it an all-in-one..

  11. #11

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    That "conjoined" design might be a bit of a pig if you need to take it apart to maintain anything but I never need to touch mine from one year to the next. Less hose is good though. Just DONT put bioballs/sponge in - making work for yourself as you'll have to clean them. I would reverse the flow so it goes through the heater first then reactor so any gas blows into the tank not into the heater. I'd put the CO2 injection point into the lid of the reactor (save a bit more space).

    For turbulence - what I do with my pipe reactors where the inlet is in the centre of the lid is to put a narrower inlet (higher velocity) that extends part way into the reactor and then I drill a few small "verturi holes" at a downward pointing angle into this "nozzle" so that any gas bubble that accumulates in the top of he reactor (location A in the pic below) is sucked through the drilled venturi holes back into the inlet stream - (edit - pic below). The water filters have the inlet to one side of the lid so its probably enough to just tweak the inlet hole in the underside of the cap to make the water spin around the chamber in a circle if it doesn't already. They have the advantage of being clear so you can see if everything dissolves or not - if not another option is to just wedge a little rubber hose in the hole under the cap (the inlet to the filter chamber) so the water "jets in" a bit... but not so jetted that it restricts flow... if that makes sense.... e.g. if the inlet hole is 16mm you might restrict it down to 12mm just to increase the inflowing velocity a bit.



    Top of reactor is a male thread - I then use a nut/tail to attach the hose

    I would also omit one of the 90 bends at the bottom of the heater and pivot the heater 90 degrees until its horizontal to raise the inlet to nearer the outlet height on your canister filter. A couple of pipe clamps can hold the heater tube to the wall of your cabinet. Put a quick release (double tap) between the filter and the heater so you can easily remove the filter. Hose/nut/tail with rubber sealing washer (like you'd attach to a garden tap) onto male threads makes it easy to remove the hoses and change sizes (in place of the hose nipple "directors").
    Last edited by Grubs; 04-12-17 at 12:52 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    These still seem a bit pricey imo, has anyone found a cheaper source from OS?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grubs View Post
    That "conjoined" design might be a bit of a pig if you need to take it apart to maintain anything but I never need to touch mine from one year to the next. Less hose is good though. Just DONT put bioballs/sponge in - making work for yourself as you'll have to clean them. I would reverse the flow so it goes through the heater first then reactor so any gas blows into the tank not into the heater. I'd put the CO2 injection point into the lid of the reactor (save a bit more space).

    For turbulence - what I do with my pipe reactors where the inlet is in the centre of the lid is to put a narrower inlet (higher velocity) that extends part way into the reactor and then I drill a few small "verturi holes" at a downward pointing angle into this "nozzle" so that any gas bubble that accumulates in the top of he reactor is sucked through the drilled venturi holes back into the inlet stream - yes a diagram would help but no time today . The water filters have the inlet to one side of the lid so its probably enough to just tweak the inlet hole in the underside of the cap to make the water spin around the chamber in a circle if it doesn't already. They have the advantage of being clear so you can see if everything dissolves or not - if not another option is to just wedge a little rubber hose in the hole under the cap (the inlet to the filter chamber) so the water "jets in" a bit... but not so jetted that it restricts flow... if that makes sense.... e.g. if the inlet hole is 16mm you might restrict it down to 12mm just to increase the inflowing velocity a bit.


    I would also omit one of the 90 bends at the bottom of the heater and pivot the heater 90 degrees until its horizontal to raise the inlet to nearer the outlet height on your canister filter. A couple of pipe clamps can hold the heater tube to the wall of your cabinet. Put a quick release (double tap) between the filter and the heater so you can easily remove the filter. Hose/nut/tail with rubber sealing washer (like you'd attach to a garden tap) onto male threads makes it easy to remove the hoses and change sizes (in place of the hose nipple "directors").

    thanks for the detailed explanation mate.. i tried following it a few times but get a bit lost on some details.. i get the gist though and might help to go through this again when i actually have one in my hands.. hey if you get the chance to draw it up that would be greatly appreciated, im not in an immediate rush.. i also had to look up the venturi effect haha

    good points about reversing it to hit the heater and the quick release valves.. i am assuming tilting the heater would increase the flow by fighting gravity less?

    sweefu, found them cheaper in the US but shipping brings the price right back up

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grubs View Post

    For turbulence - what I do with my pipe reactors where the inlet is in the centre of the lid is to put a narrower inlet (higher velocity) that extends part way into the reactor and then I drill a few small "verturi holes" at a downward pointing angle into this "nozzle" so that any gas bubble that accumulates in the top of he reactor is sucked through the drilled venturi holes back into the inlet stream - yes a diagram would help but no time today . The water filters have the inlet to one side of the lid so its probably enough to just tweak the inlet hole in the underside of the cap to make the water spin around the chamber in a circle if it doesn't already. They have the advantage of being clear so you can see if everything dissolves or not - if not another option is to just wedge a little rubber hose in the hole under the cap (the inlet to the filter chamber) so the water "jets in" a bit... but not so jetted that it restricts flow... if that makes sense.... e.g. if the inlet hole is 16mm you might restrict it down to 12mm just to increase the inflowing velocity a bit.
    Hi guys, the fizz in my tank is starting to get on my nerves so the reactor project is not far away at all. I was hoping someone could elaborate on a couple of suggestions Grubs made above regardling turbulance. From what i can understand it is suggested a narrower inlet is placed in the centre of the housing head that only extends partway down, pointed in such a way that it makes water spin in a circle. Also some clarification on the 'verturi holes' to remove gas build up.

    regarding the first point, i have read this post about putting the centre pipe either right down the bottom Vs what grubs suggested. Which of the two methods here would dissolve CO2 more efficiently/what is the science behind it?

    I am having a bit of a problem visualising how exactly to make it the bit about the verturi holes and how this actually works. My understanding is to drill these holes from the bottom up, into the nozzle inserted into the middle from the outside going in. How far down would i drill these holes, how big is it suggested the holes are? Ok, so construction of these holes aside, how do they actually work. If water/gas is coming into the reactor, through to the middle hole and then to the nozzle, how would co2 be then sucked back into the nozzle? if water was going through this nozzle, wouldnt the co2/water be coming through the nozzle and out of these verturi holes instead of the CO2 already in the reactor getting sucked back in?

    hope i am making sense.

    and sorry just one more question, instead of the cerges filter reactor i was also looking at this build. Any suggestions as to which to go for and why?


    btw, i have gone against a two-in-one approach and will be making a separate inline heater... thanks in advance

  15. #15
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    a diy heater is easy and effective, but a CO2 reactor is more fiddly and not so sure if it's worth the effort.

    a sera reactor (1000 model) is about $80.
    then there is the myriad of cheaper brands out there too.
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