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Thread: Cryptocoryne spec. 'Flamingo' Update Thread

  1. #1
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    Default Cryptocoryne spec. 'Flamingo' Update Thread

    As most of the more active members here will have recently found out, I got hold of some 'Flamingo' a few months ago and contrary to what Dennerle would have you believe, it is definitely not easy to grow - or at least that has been my experience so far. As someone who keeps many varieties of crypts, this one has definitely proven to be the most challenging out of any that haven't immediately died.

    The plants I began with were quite large (about as large as you see for sale at the moment in Australia at about 5cm tall) but the rhizomes were minuscule (each was only a few millimetres long). I'm assuming due to the gel they had been growing in they may not have had as much of a need to store energy in the rhizome? I have trialled the plants both submerged inside with CO2 and under high light, emerse inside and also emerse in the greenhouse in an attempt to keep all of my eggs out of one basket if something happened to go wrong in one set of conditions, however I have had fatalities of about four of every five plants even so.

    Considering my experiences so far, it really would seem that starting with 'Flamingo' straight out of tissue-culture (which is mainly what is available here at the present time) is a big risk and knowing what I know now I would much rather have had bought a more expensive full-sized plant over many smaller plants at the same price (which is the opposite of what I would normally prefer to do). I guess this is just some food for thought for anyone thinking about buying them in the future as it may seem exciting to get some as they are so newly introduced, but it seems - to me, anyway - that it's a real gamble due to the immaturity of the plants in the country at the moment.


    Three plants in the greenhouse (there is a small white-coloured leaf coming up to the right of the two largest plants). (18/07/16)


    The largest plant (a few corms that were joined together) in the greenhouse. (18/07/16)


    Another one in the same tub, showing a bit of a pink tinge to the leaves. (18/07/16)


    The 'Flamingo' I have inside under low light (I would assume that is why they are green). (24/07/16)
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 29-03-17 at 11:42 AM.
    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

  2. #2
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    Feb 2015
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    Australia
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    Hi Cryptocorynus, i have a few flamingo, and have found them to be a little slow but are growing well, Ive had some melt and some not, but the melts come back, I origionally had them potted in aquasoil in a tank with the light a little to high and on the older leaves were getting a little algae, i now have co2 on the tank and made the mistake of trimming off the old leaves, which had slowed them right down, and some smaller ones i pulled & repotted in a mix of aquasoil onyx sand and a thin layer of a powdered clay a friend gave me to try and gave them a little shade and are starting to come back, i still have a couple of little ones i was wanting to try emersesd, the only crypt ive got going emersed is Crypt nurii potted in aquasoil and in a large jar on a heat pad and they are a little slow but growing nicely and a couple runners are popping up, the thing about putting some of the small flamingo in a emersed growing enviroment is im worried ill lose their water leaves but the ones im thinking of only have 3 or 4 smallish leaves any how, how long did yours start to show some emersed growth,
    cheers christian, heres some of mine
    cheers christian
    Last edited by hoodie75; 31-07-16 at 10:42 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the photos, Christian! I think my troubles can be mainly attributed to splitting them too soon into individual plants (it looks like you've kept them clumped). I think it was at least a few weeks before the first one (shown in this photo) sprouted. You can see the original leaves that have wilted and are resting on the mix. I was actually very surprised how large and healthy the first leaf was.

    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

  4. #4
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    looks great, ill give some a go

  5. #5
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    Hi Cryptocorynus, im trying to pm you but your box is full

  6. #6
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    Hey guys, can I ask why you are growing these emersed? ; for flowers and ID??

    during winter these will slow right down and struggle. (Crypt how hot is your hot house at night?)

    I found in general that crypts grow fast in co2 submersed.

    Do you find this variety to be very difficult?
    Last edited by Rebel; 17-09-16 at 08:34 AM.

  7. #7
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    Most growers using T/C or seedlings transfer the plants, initially, to small 'group pots' since they usually benefit from the company. This is because the active roots ( in this case) actually inject oxygen into the soil and also because the uptake of ferts from a lot of roots is faster and stops a buildup of salts that will prevent uptake thru osmosis.
    Another problem often met with the transfer to emerse growth is stagnation in the soil. Hoodie avoided this by applying heat to the root zone, allowing circulation in the area. In nature, the riparian zone may look to be similar to the soil in Crytocoynus' plastic tub but the difference there is mainly the lack of circulation.
    And....one more point is that we usually expect plants to develop best colour under high lighting but in the case of variegated aroids, high light is more likely to cause burning.
    Last edited by anthonyrae; 24-08-16 at 10:35 AM.

  8. #8
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    Very interesting stuff, anthonyrae! For the soil in the container I'm using a loamy krasnozem soil found under a large native fig, which due to the moisture and decomposition under the tree because of the shaded position, has created an idea soil mix, and one I believe to be quite close to what they would be growing in naturally. However, I'm aware of the lack of circulation in the pots and am currently working on a large grow bed which will be rigged up with some flowing water from the IBCs.

    As for your question about why I'm growing them emerse as opposed to submerged, Rebel, I have found that growing emerse is a lot less demanding in terms of maintenance and seems to - in my experience, anyway - create much healthier and more "stable" plants. I've also found that vegetative reproduction is much faster emerse for almost all species. Flowering would be another reason to grow emerse as would the idea of keeping a back-up of submerse plants. I'm unsure of the minimum temperature the greenhouse gets down to, but the night I've found isn't the issue, but rather back-to-back overcast days which slowly but surely bring down the temperature. The greenhouse is able to stay at almost the same temperature overnight as in the day (26-30 degrees, sometimes ever hotter) due to the amount of water in the IBCs (which is currently in excess of about 10,000 litres). From memory, the lowest it has ever reached is about 10 degrees, but I'll check the max/min thermometer tomorrow for you.

    Most of the difficulty I've been having can probably be brought down to my own stupidity in splitting the plants too early, but even so I believe they are a very slow-growing crypt. To put how slow they are into perspective I've had faster growth emerse from corms of the same size (I'm still unsure if "corm" is the right terminology) from members of the cordata group.
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 03-12-16 at 07:00 AM.
    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

  9. #9
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    Such a wonderful plant. Hope to see more of these around soon.

  10. #10
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    They're getting a little bigger, but don't have much non-green colouration apart from the newest leaves (this is probably due to them being emerse).


    Outside in the greenhouse - largest plant.
    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

  11. #11
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    im growing a few smaller ones emersed, and think yours looks great, ive seen plenty of pics showing emersed plants totally pink and almost leathery leaves, im sure lots of sun will do you well, wait till summer and im sure your plants will look awesome, well more :-)

  12. #12
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    A plant which seems to have a much more cordate (heart-shaped/rounded) leaf shape. The older leaves also turn dark green on this plant unlike my others which seem to turn a white colour while retaining green veins. Please forgive the less than optimal photos as my point-and-shoot had a very hard time autofocusing.



    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 28-03-17 at 10:56 AM.
    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

  13. #13
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    OK....I think you better send that one to me for safekeeping.

  14. #14
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    Hey Luke, what is the carpet of moss/plant you have in the pot? Looks nice.

  15. #15
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    I have had a few people ask about that moss, but alas it's just a terrestrial one. I imagine when I collected the dirt there must have been spores(?) in it. Lots of small maidenhair and other ferns and liverworts (sometimes even mushrooms) pop up in other pots, too, which probably also came from spores originally. It all does a really good job of minimising the BGA-like algae(?) which runs rampant over the surface of pots with bare dirt.


    Check this one out. There are a few C. wendtii 'Tropica' down there... somewhere...
    Last edited by Cryptocorynus; 16-05-17 at 08:20 PM.
    Rainbowfish, Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus

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