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Thread: DIY power LED for nano

  1. #16
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    Hey Rebel, any update on this project?
    Cheers

  2. #17

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    I was wondering the same thing as I silently observe your project.

  3. #18
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    bloody oath Rebel, show us some pics already!

  4. #19
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    I've bought the box for the drivers. I tested two channels simultaneously for 10 mins via the TC420 at 350ma and it worked for about 10 mins. I suspect the drivers are not rated for enough wattage. So all I can post is a photo of darkness.

    For the nerds I ask....how fast is darkness?

  5. #20
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    Ok I can't really figure out the problem. I used these drivers to drive each strip of 5x 3W leds at 350ma 12V (they are rated for 700ma). The 12V 7A DC power supply was connected to the TC 420 and two separate channels supplied two strips (one was not connected) for 10 minutes. Then the lights went off and I have not been able to light them using the drivers. I used the drivers on the middle unused strip and it looks very dim. Each individual LED seems to be working when tested with the multimeter.

    Any clues to figure out this issue? have I used the wrong drivers..

    Specs of the above drivers

    5-35V input range


    Output 350mAħ20mA drive 1-10 pieces 1W LED
    PWM dimming.
    Buck mode LED guarantee total pressure is lower than the input supply voltage 2-3V to work.
    Ultra-small size design (length 3.6cm * Width 2cm), low noise, safety features.
    High-efficiency, low power consumption, stable chip for energy saving and environmental protection projects.
    Constant output current, low ripple, improve the LED light stability and lifetime.
    Overload, short circuit, overcurrent protection, to ensure the supply security.
    Wide input voltage, VIN+ and VIN- are the positive and negative power input, respectively.

  6. #21
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    May 2013
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    I thought the tc420 needs 24V?

    Edit: ignore.
    Last edited by vladguan; 06-07-16 at 06:43 AM.

  7. #22
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    Also the drivers themselves have a pwm port. I wonder whether one needs to use a pwm dimmer connected to these? I think they dim if the pwm port is between 0-5V.

  8. #23
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    OT but if YOU think you can DIY, then the answer is that you can't. Not as well as this guy.

    Last edited by Rebel; 07-07-16 at 11:22 AM.

  9. #24
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    Give an update will ya?!

  10. #25

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    I'm no electronics expert, but aren't the drivers a bit small for the LEDs?
    What sort of actual power supply is there?

    By my reckoning, a 3W, 3V LED is going to draw 1 Amp @ 3V - a 1A 12V power supply should be able to run 4 of these LEDs.
    It seems to me that a 350mA driver is a bit small.

    The Amps is how much power the LED will draw - if you want to run it at half power, you have to turn down the voltage (giving it a smaller straw to drink from)
    If the driver / power supply can't provide enough power (current) they overheat & fail.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grahama View Post
    I'm no electronics expert, but aren't the drivers a bit small for the LEDs?
    What sort of actual power supply is there?

    By my reckoning, a 3W, 3V LED is going to draw 1 Amp @ 3V - a 1A 12V power supply should be able to run 4 of these LEDs.
    It seems to me that a 350mA driver is a bit small.

    The Amps is how much power the LED will draw - if you want to run it at half power, you have to turn down the voltage (giving it a smaller straw to drink from)
    If the driver / power supply can't provide enough power (current) they overheat & fail.

    The project has stalled as I don't know how to fix the issue.

    Graham, the drivers supply 350ma constant current= 1.5W per LED/.. The LEDs will accept 700ma constant current but I don't want to drive them too high.

    I will need to hunt down some 350ma drivers which are rated for higher wattage though. You are right that these may be too small.

    Correct me if I am wrong. I probably am.

  12. #27
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    Aug 2014
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    Footscray, Melbourne
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    Rebel, have a look at the Meanwell LDD drivers, I have used them in my take of the Typhon light and they have worked really well.

    I also used LDD-1000 modules and the LED's are way over driven, even though the CREE XP-G LEDs are rated to 1.5A. I have another water cooled light designed which will be running the Epileds that MML use. They will be driven at 450 mA max which should be ok with a water cooled housing.

  13. #28

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    Yeah, I don't know about LED drivers - just did some research and learned some stuff but also realised there's a lot more I don't know

    What you've done sounds like it should have worked. I think I've stalled too.

    just to recap my first sentence. "I'm no electronics expert"

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hdjwilliams View Post
    Rebel, have a look at the Meanwell LDD drivers, I have used them in my take of the Typhon light and they have worked really well.

    I also used LDD-1000 modules and the LED's are way over driven, even though the CREE XP-G LEDs are rated to 1.5A. I have another water cooled light designed which will be running the Epileds that MML use. They will be driven at 450 mA max which should be ok with a water cooled housing.
    Wow man, those Typhon builds are uber awesome; and complex.

    Do you know how to use the PWM dimming on the LDD drivers? For example can I use a TC 420 with a LDD driver?

  15. #30
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    Aug 2014
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    Footscray, Melbourne
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    With a little electronics know how the Typhon controllers aren't too bad and there is a heap of info on the forums on how to wire them up - if you are after a project its not too difficult / expensive if you purchase it all off ebay.

    That TC420 probably outputs a constant voltage 12v PWM signal which then relies on the LED strip light to do its own current limiting. The LDD drivers require a 0-5v signal (with most of the dimming in the 0-3v range i.e. its non-linear), you may be able to do some crude voltage division using a resistor string but would need to have a look at the output of the TC420 to be sure.

    I did a super quick google and it looks like a bit of a hack is required to get to the control side of the power mosfets in the TC420:

    http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/20...d-drivers.html

    I would hazard a guess you have smoked your current drivers by running 12v into the dimming pin, but cant be sure. Can you manually set the dimming pin of your current drivers to 0 and 5V to see if they are still working. Fault finding is just a case of isolating blocks and testing.

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