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Thread: POINTED TAILS ON GUPPY FRY? genetic or parasite related disease?

  1. #1
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    Unhappy POINTED TAILS ON GUPPY FRY? genetic or parasite related disease?

    So I've noticed recently that my guppy fry (about 1-2 months old), have developed a pointed/ clamped tail-fin.
    I've seen this in the past, and as a result, lost most of them.
    I'm wondering if anyone knows if it's a genetic or parasitical disease? And is there any way I can treat it? (eg: multi-cure or aquarium salts).
    I'd setup a quarantine tank but i don't have another available filter and heater to do so at this stage.

    I've posted a few pictures below.
    Thanks in advance!


    You can see the one on the right looks normal, however the two on the left have the clamped tail.


    Close-up of the sick fry.


    Another close-up.


    Another fry with the same issue. (5 of the 7 have the same problem).
    Natalie.

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    Sorry, I posted 3 of the same images without realising. Here are the rest.



    Natalie.

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    Only time my fry have clamped their tails like that is when they were suffering from ich. It can be very hard to spot on small fry so I use a strong LED torch and check my fry over to make sure they are clear of parasites and other nasties.

    I wouldn't dose any medication yet until you know what is causing it as fry can be sensitive, and I have found using medications at half-dosage as suggested really doesn't do much.

    I am assuming your water parameters are fine...

    Got any further info about your set-up and care of these guys?

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    Quote Originally Posted by A Little Fishy View Post
    Only time my fry have clamped their tails like that is when they were suffering from ich. It can be very hard to spot on small fry so I use a strong LED torch and check my fry over to make sure they are clear of parasites and other nasties.

    I wouldn't dose any medication yet until you know what is causing it as fry can be sensitive, and I have found using medications at half-dosage as suggested really doesn't do much.

    I am assuming your water parameters are fine...

    Got any further info about your set-up and care of these guys?
    That's interesting though because it hasn't seemed to spread to any of my other fish, even the last time I had fry. It was just the fry that became infected and died as a result.
    And this time I have 2 that seem to look normal, at this stage.
    I've been dosing them with multi-cure for about a week now but nothing's changed. The parameters are fine too, so I really have no idea what could be causing it.
    Possibly lack of water-flow through their breeder?
    Natalie.

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    I've found if you take a guppy and put it in a salt bath....teaspoon salt/litre
    They spread their fins....you will then find out if its disease or genetic..
    Goggle guppy disease....this may be their problem
    Also guppies prefer water with high conductivity(hard/alkaline).....they are more susceptible to disease if not in preferred water chemistry

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    I had some guppies that were constantly getting sick. They were living in soft, acidic water; they were inbred too, though, but if your pH is low and the water is soft, that may be part of the problem.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and give the impression you're stupid than to open it and remove all doubt."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    I've found if you take a guppy and put it in a salt bath....teaspoon salt/litre
    They spread their fins....you will then find out if its disease or genetic..
    Goggle guppy disease....this may be their problem
    Also guppies prefer water with high conductivity(hard/alkaline).....they are more susceptible to disease if not in preferred water chemistry
    Thanks, I might try that and see how they go. Hopefully they'll be ok.
    Natalie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew_822 View Post
    I had some guppies that were constantly getting sick. They were living in soft, acidic water; they were inbred too, though, but if your pH is low and the water is soft, that may be part of the problem.
    Being in-bred could be the issue. Seeing as I only have 1 new male, and the rest are all related (bred from my first pair). I think it's time for some new blood!
    Natalie.

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    Hi Natalie,
    You do know guppies are brackish water fish? All the guppies you saw at my place are in a brackish water, light salt though as I want my plants to grow and I have other fish in there that can take light salt water. You saw the tank, so my suggestion is add a small amount of aquarium salt to the tank and I think you will find the little ones will pick up. If you don't have any Aquarium salt you know where I am.

    . ...Leigh

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    Quote Originally Posted by atwistedlife View Post
    Hi Natalie,
    You do know guppies are brackish water fish? All the guppies you saw at my place are in a brackish water, light salt though as I want my plants to grow and I have other fish in there that can take light salt water. You saw the tank, so my suggestion is add a small amount of aquarium salt to the tank and I think you will find the little ones will pick up. If you don't have any Aquarium salt you know where I am.
    I'm not entirely sure that is true; from what I know, they can be found in freshwater and brackish habitats. My guess would be that most of the ones for sale would be used to fresh water. Having said that, brackish shouldn't hurt them, but you have to be careful if you have other fish in the tank. I've even heard they can live in full marine.

    What is the pH and hardness of your tank's water?

    Having said all that, I don't have much experience with them.
    "It's better to keep your mouth shut and give the impression you're stupid than to open it and remove all doubt."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stew_822 View Post
    I'm not entirely sure that is true; from what I know, they can be found in freshwater and brackish habitats. My guess would be that most of the ones for sale would be used to fresh water. Having said that, brackish shouldn't hurt them, but you have to be careful if you have other fish in the tank. I've even heard they can live in full marine.

    What is the pH and hardness of your tank's water?

    Having said all that, I don't have much experience with them.
    Yes, I've also heard they can live in full marine, as can mollies i think. If i decide to add some aquarium salts, i'll most likely move them into a quarantine tank, as I don't want to harm my siamese flying fox, dwarf gourami and bristtle-nose.
    The pH is around 7.0-7.5 I think, but i'll have to double-check. And Adelaide's water is pretty hard. So frustrating!
    Natalie.

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    Adelaide's water is not all hard. It depends which dam you're being fed from. The one that feeds the hills area around the inner freeway (I'm not sure how much further, I suspect down to South Rd, probably further West & North) has a clay base and very soft water. The major issue from that one can be pH swings if you're not careful with your substrate. Excellent for most plant growth though. I'm told there's another further north, feeding the northern suburbs with the same issues. Many of the dams feeding the Western suburbs in particular have incredibly hard water by the time it reaches them.

    Moral of the story is - there's such fluctuation depending on your water source, you need to test your own water from your tap and in your tank, not just listen to what you've read about the city's water. And putting up the results would be useful for us.
    "Weeds are just plants growing in the wrong place" - Jackie French
    Gardening is just racism for plants - Amber, The Old Guys

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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscusEden View Post
    Adelaide's water is not all hard. It depends which dam you're being fed from. The one that feeds the hills area around the inner freeway (I'm not sure how much further, I suspect down to South Rd, probably further West & North) has a clay base and very soft water. The major issue from that one can be pH swings if you're not careful with your substrate. Excellent for most plant growth though. I'm told there's another further north, feeding the northern suburbs with the same issues. Many of the dams feeding the Western suburbs in particular have incredibly hard water by the time it reaches them.

    Moral of the story is - there's such fluctuation depending on your water source, you need to test your own water from your tap and in your tank, not just listen to what you've read about the city's water. And putting up the results would be useful for us.
    Yeah, well I live North-East of the city so I presume it's pretty hard. And yes, the pH does fluctuate between 7.0-8.5 usually. I'll do a proper test when I can though and let you all know. Thanks for the info.
    Natalie.

  14. #14
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    Clamped or 'pin-tailed' guppies I have found to always be due to bacterial or parasitic infection. Guppies and other live bearers are particularly susceptible to a myriad of things.

    However, hard, alkaline and/or brackish water will help to considerably reduce these issues and increase guppy (and most other live bearer) health.

    Unlike mollies, guppies can NOT live in pure salt water. They will die, regardless of the amount of acclimatization given. I read the myth that they can live in salt water, & have tried them on a number of occasions with absolutely zero success.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquariumtherapy View Post
    Clamped or 'pin-tailed' guppies I have found to always be due to bacterial or parasitic infection. Guppies and other live bearers are particularly susceptible to a myriad of things.

    However, hard, alkaline and/or brackish water will help to considerably reduce these issues and increase guppy (and most other live bearer) health.

    Unlike mollies, guppies can NOT live in pure salt water. They will die, regardless of the amount of acclimatization given. I read the myth that they can live in salt water, & have tried them on a number of occasions with absolutely zero success.
    Thanks for all the info, that's what I suspected. Is there a way you'd recommend for me to treat them? Should I dose them with multi-cure?
    Natalie.

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