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Thread: Small NT Gobies

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Small NT Gobies

    In 1988 I met my first little NT Gobies. I could not find any book to identify them so I took them to the NT Museum where I met Helen Larson. Helen was the Curator of Fishes at the NT Museum up till two years ago. She retired from Government service but is still working with fishes in Qld. I collected a bag of small gobies in the River Charloette one day back in 1989. I took them to the NT Museum to Helen to ask for help with identification. I was told there was at least 4 new species in the bag. Helen has described most of the small gobies now but there is probably more that need to be found.

    I kept the little gobies in aquaria and tried to breed them, many attempts failed, they would lay eggs and they would hatch into the tiniest little fry larvae I had ever seen. The main problem was the size of the first live foods. I obtained a couple of microscopes and some aquaculture plankton manuals but it all seemed too hard, and too time consuming. Too much science all at once.

    Recently, last month we had a visit from our German Fish-loving friends who came to Oz for the ANGFA Convention. They did the tourist bit in the NT and then went to Brisbane to the convention, then they got stuck with a Qantas Problem on the way home. Took them an extra day to get home. Gilbert sent me a story by Michael Taxacher about breeding Mugilogobius chulae, a fish from those nice lakes in Sulawesi where all the nice little shrimps are located. In the fry raising description there was a section on identification of the first live foods.

    This little piece of information has spurred me into action during the week. I have been visiting a few local creeks and have about 50 little gobies the same as my avatar. I have been to the Darwin Aquaculture Centre looking for help with ciliate and rotifer cultures. Micahael Taxacher has been kind and sent me his goby article in a word document and it has been run through Google translate and now slightly resembles English. I will work on the translation to make it more readable then Michael will allow us to publish it in a journal of his choice.

    His article is from the German Aquarium magazine "AMAZONAS SŁŖwasseraquaristik-Fachmagazin" and is titled "Grundeln der Mugilogobius" which when hit with the Google Translater comes out to be, "Gobies of the genus Mugilogobius". Mr Taxacher has written an account of breeding Mugilogobius chulae and raising the fry. I am going to try to copy his fry raising methods with the local small gobies that are very similar to his subjects. I will put updates here.

    These are some of the local gobies that need some attention.

    Chlamydogobius ranunculus (Larson, 1995) have raised these in captivity.

    Hemigobius hoevenii (Bleeker, 1851) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobois filifer (Larson, 2001) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobois littoralis (Larson, 2001) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobois mertoni (Weber, 1911) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobius platystomus (GŁnther, 1872) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobois rivulus (Larson, 2001) never bred in captivity

    Mugilogobius wilsoni (Larson, 2001) spawned but fry not raised

    Redigobius chrysosoma (Bleeker, 1875) never bred in captivity

    Redigobius nanus (Larson, 2010) never bred in captivity

    Cheers
    Dave

  2. #2
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    Default

    Good stuff Mr Wilson

    I do like our little aussie gobies

    Graeme
    Read this very helpful thread on BSS .
    No pictures on your BSS advert? Then be prepared for it to be deleted ( read the rules )

  3. #3
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    Looking forward to seeing how this goes!

    Do these gobies require some salinity as they develop? Seems like all the amphidromous fish are very hard to breed.

  4. #4
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    Not Chlamydogobius ranunculus it has largish eggs. I'll get some breeding this year and make them available to hobbyistys. The small gobies and many of the estuarine critters have large numbers of underdeveloped eggs/larvae whereas things that have evolved more in freshwater have less numbers of better developed eggs. It has been a challenge to raise some of these little critters from the euryhaline areas. I have been trying to breed my avatar goby since 1988.

    I am trying to track down a microscope of sufficient quality to see the small ciliates and measure them. I have ciliates and rotifers in my cultures but the goby fry of Mugilogobius wilsoni dont go onto eat rotifers for 9 or 10 days of age. Their first foods are reported to be ciliates such as Euplotes that are 20 to 30 microns.

    If anyone knows of a good quality microscope with measuring graduations that doesn't cost 10,000 dollars I would be pleased if they shared that knowledge. The microscope at the Darwin Aquaculture Centre they use is an Olympus CX40. I was able to look at my cultures through that this week and they are kind enough to let me in their laboratory but it is 40km away and I don't want to wear out my welcome.

    Cheers
    dave
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    Last edited by Dave; 25-11-11 at 09:04 AM.

  5. #5
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    Great project Dave!!

    I can't help with the microscope but would be happy to help. I do love the gobies!
    If it swims it's good, if it's Sahul it's better!

  6. #6
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    One of Robyn's work friends loaned me a nice microscope. Now all I need to start up is a few more bits. The slides that measure the critters, the ones with the 10 micron graduations for measuring, if there is such a beast. I ordered some mesh to make live food sieves. We are going to start with 200 micron, 100 micron, 50 micron and 11 micron mesh. That should get us some critters bigger than 11 micron and smaller than 50 micron for the first foods. I put some pics in when the mesh arrives. Fresh hatch brine shrimp are usually bigger than 200 microns, rotifers are between 80 and 130 micron. That will give you an idea what we are trying to achieve.

    Cheers
    Dave

  7. #7
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    Great stuff, Dave!

    Let me know if you need help with the translation. (I'm Austrian)
    [SIGPIC]http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d9/wolfy80/otellia10200a.jpg[/SIGPIC]


    Subvert the dominant paradigm!

  8. #8
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    Great project *pulls up a chair*

    Will be watching this one

  9. #9
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    I have a microscope (borrowed) up to the task. Here are two little critters, not quite small enough. The rotifer is estimated about 80 microns and the napuli of cyclops perhaps (a guess) is about 120 microns. Both are too big for the goby fry. Apparently I need a graticule to help me measure the critters.

    Cheers
    Dave
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  10. #10
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    No way

    that is just tooo hard

    ( what is green water made up of Dave? )

    Graeme
    Read this very helpful thread on BSS .
    No pictures on your BSS advert? Then be prepared for it to be deleted ( read the rules )

  11. #11
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    Good to see the microscope works Even better you can photograph the images, nice work

  12. #12
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    I just put the canon ixus on the eye piece and took a photo, they did not come out very well. We need more lessons/experience in microscope operation. Aparaently I need an eye piece reticule and a microscope micrometer to calibrate the scale.

    We had a little set back with the brood stock, they have parasite problem. I treated them with formalin malachite green mix, hopefully that will improve things. They have been darting about eratically scraping themselves on objects in the aquarium. Always a problem collecting wild fishes, quarantine is very important.

    Cheers
    Dave

  13. #13
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    Hello Graeme,
    Green water is algae, some of them are motile, they can swim, some are very small, around 15 to 20 microns for the smaller alga. The euplotes are small animals and the algae are small plants. Last night there were about 10 little ciliates attacking an algae cell but they were not getting anywhere, it is a fascinating world, cant wait till the measuring scale (Eyepiece reticule and stage micrometer) arrive. I have one paper from a friend, identifying small ciliates. I am keen to get more literature to help id the small life. I was photographing copepods (Cyclops) last night but could not get them clear, they are about one third the size of moina.
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  14. #14
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    Here is a better photo of cyclops. There is one with an egg sack. These little animals are quite large compared to the food we want to culture for the Mugilogobius fry. These are fed as live foods to the adults to help get them in breeding condition. These things are about 500 microns (guess)

    A meter has 100 centimeters, a centimeter 10 millimeters, a millimeter has 1000 microns, there is a million microns in a meter. A human hair is about 60 to 90 microns thick so our 15 micron critters for goby fry food are tiny.

    Cheers
    Dave
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    Last edited by Dave; 03-12-11 at 07:05 AM. Reason: misinformation corrected

  15. #15
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    Hi Dave,

    I have had these little guys in my fry tanks before. Eggs must be in the Spirulina powder I fed my fry.

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