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Thread: 'Dreamtime' - the life and times of my 600l showpiece.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Brisbane
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    My gob is well and truly smacked. Going to have to steal you light stand idea too!
    Matt.

  2. #17
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    Jun 2007
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    Brisbane, QLD
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    Brilliant stuff! I love what you did with the lighting.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Balga Perth West Aust
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    8,132

    Thumbs up love it

    I love it so far

    If your scape is as good as the tank work so far it will be AMAZING!!!

    Love the downlights,i planned to do that with mine but never got round to it.
    Cant wait to see yours!!

    Graeme
    Read this very helpful thread on BSS .
    No pictures on your BSS advert? Then be prepared for it to be deleted ( read the rules )

  4. #19
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    Jul 2007
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    South Coast NSW
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    A lot of thought has been put into this and it shows, absolutely outstanding.

  5. #20
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    Jan 2007
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    Australia Victoria Melbourne
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    Clearly something you have put a lot of thought into, the lighting is brilliant. looking forward to seeing how it goes from here!
    Thanks for coming, and don't forget to purchase some orange drink, for the long drive home! -Principal Skinner

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Jandakot, WA
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    444

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    We're all WOW WOW WOWWING and it hasn't even got anything in it yet! I can just imagine how awesome it will look once it's all done.

    Bargain tank too. I paid more than that for a 4x2x2 with polished edges and black silicone and it was made around the corner. How do they do it??

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria
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    94

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    I think everyone have already said what I was thinking. Its simply magnificent! You were describing your tank with the light fittings at the pub the other day and was curious how it looked. I'm glad you posted photos to complete the picture. I know you had to wait a while for the cabinet, but looks like it was all worth it! Can't wait to see it fully planted.

  8. #23

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    Wholey crap guys - your enthusiasm is infectious and your positive comments much appreciated. Thankyou all.

    @Holotype - The lights are currently set for the glass shield to be 30cm above the filled water level. I can raise the lights another 6cm only before the bottom of the vertical tube clears the lower U-bolt. I can lower them right down though. If I do find that I want to go higher - then I'll just have to buy 3 longer square poles (about $10 each) and another can of spray paint - so its no big deal if it ever came to that.

    @ shewey - substrate will be DIY gravel + zeolite with laterite capped with fine (2mm) gravel. I am planting a lot of stem plants and I'm sure I'll be pulling them up and replanting a lot so I'm going for a more homogenous layer on the top rather than the natural effect that I got on the Snag as I think it will be easier to maintain.

    @ Cloudy - I put another bottle in the rack tonight The "art work" is a print of some reeds and lily leaves floating on a pond surface bought by Mrs Grubs years ago. I never realised it was such a suitable place-holder!

    @ Shake - yes! Today was a total dog. I drained the Snag - using my canister to pump 300l down the garden hose - down the hall and up into the 6ft Dreamtime tank. I lifted each corner of the Snag's cabinet with a breaker bar and slid a piece of thin acryic under each corner so that it would slide. I then slid the whole enchilada - complete with gravel and logs and 1" of water with some very angry fish - approximately 90mm along the wall to the left to put the left edge of the stand directly over the floor joist. I then removed the acrylic - re-leveled the tank - then used the eheim to pump 200l back down the hall to refill the Snag in its "new" location. I took the opportunity to do a 100l water change! What a PITA - but the floor is thanking me already and all the creaks and groans and spongyness have gone... {{phew!}}.

    @AQUAMX - I dont have a lot of tanks (yet!) - so I want to grow a lot of species in this tank and try to use them to create a rich tapestry of colour and form (arty farty talk meaning pack everything into one tank but make it look good!). I was thinking along these lines, or like this but with more diversity of foreground types and a more diverse fern/wood layer. I dont have large quantities of any one species yet - so I'll be planting a bit of a patchwork to start off - but once they grow and I have a better idea of how the different species perform under my care I may be in a better position to rescape with a more formal structured design - or at least with a clearer vision in my head. At the moment there are too many unknowns for me - which makes it fun - but very hard for me to visualise the aquascape! More pub meals. That was good eatin'


    I have plants stashed everywhere at the moment - my 70l is packed, I have bunches floating in every tank, vase and bucket - some without lights. Most are fairly common species. Perhaps I'll get more WOW factor feature plants after the inevitable new-tank algae/diatom blooms pass.

    I'm glad everyone likes the light stands - I struggled with plans for DIY pendant lights for a while, or frames that sat on top of the tank so you couldn't see any poles behind the tank. I was going to paint the vertical poles the same colour as the wall - but I didn't have any wall paint left.

    I sent all three of the halide ballasts back to Osram for exchange today - I'll be lucky to see the replacements for at least a week. *sigh*

    If I get the hardscape in this weekend - I may end up just planting it out and hoping the plants can survive for 4-5 days without lights! A few plants arrived from Dave today (safe and sound thx Dave ) - without a home to go to!

    Last hurdle that I've been putting off.... CO2. The cabinet is 830 tall, but as its on legs the cupboards are only 650mm tall inside - too small for a D size CO2 bottle. My plan is to put the bottle in my office and run the CO2 line under the house and up through the floor. This will require about 8m of CO2 proof tubing so it will need to be "good stuff". I cant seem to find any technical information on the stuff sold as "co2 tubing" from various e-vendors other than "loses less than 1% of CO2" which is a totally meaningless statistic without a distance or pressure measurement! Perhaps I need to ring the gas company for some advice. Any thoughts?
    Last edited by Grubs; 16-08-07 at 11:23 PM.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    732

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    Grubs

    The metal cabinet doors are different and visually effective.

    You have done a great job of the lighting supports with the gate parts.

    Can't wait to see what kind of growth you get with those lights.

    With regards to the CO2, maybe some copper tubing under the floor would be your best bet if it is a permanent setup. Zero CO2 loss. The extra expense of using copper may well pay for itself in the years to come, considering any polymeric product seeps and wastes CO2 by the osmotic effect. You could work out how much a 1% loss of CO2 costs you. And, you are correct about the length of tube and the pressure. The greater these are, the more gas you shall lose.

    Overall, great job mate, it is very inspiring.
    Last edited by Matt31; 17-08-07 at 12:11 AM.
    Regards

    Matt

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Howard Springs NT
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOLOMON View Post
    booze and aquaria nice choice!
    you need the booze to numb the time while you plant glosso or other small plant. Red wine is a good choice to help with the planting.

    Cheers
    Dave

  11. #26
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    Jun 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    This has to hold the record for the most replies about a tank that's still empty as of yet Grubs, the Dupla CO2 tubing is highly recommended but you'd have to custom order a length like that. I think ASA does a lot of Dupla maybe they can order it?
    Study how water flows in a valley stream,smoothly and freely between the rocks.Everything even mountains, rivers, plants and trees should be your teacher - Morihei Ueshiba

  12. #27

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    lol @ Danus - everyone likes it empty and it will grow less algae and cost far less to run - perhaps it should stay this way?


    Copper under the floor for the CO2 is easy for me to do - I asked a techo at BOC and he was iffy on the copper but not for any real good reason. He suggested stainless steel capillary tubing with silicon at each end. I'm thinking the small amount of gas lost throught the "CO2-proof" tubing might be such a trivial cost in comparison to the steel tubing so I might just get a bigger bottle and as its all the rage I'll plant a tree to offset my carbon loss!

  13. #28

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    Plant a couple it will make you feel even better how far does the tubing have to go?

  14. #29
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bellarine Peninsula, Victoria
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    5,908

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danus View Post
    This has to hold the record for the most replies about a tank that's still empty as of yet Grubs, the Dupla CO2 tubing is highly recommended but you'd have to custom order a length like that. I think ASA does a lot of Dupla maybe they can order it?
    lol..I was just thinking the same thing then came across your post.

    Wait till he puts gravel and the driftwood in. Another 3 pages.

    This thread will end up being aleast 20 pages long, and what a great read it will be.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  15. #30

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    I'll add to the bandwagon here. Looks awsome. Wish I had the patience.
    Copper tubing for CO2? The only thing I can think, and may be talking from my rear end here, is that if any hint of moisture gets in the pipes the CO2 will make it very acidic and corrode your pipes.

    Tygon tubing is used for corrosive gases (eg ozone etc). Here is a comment from another website:
    "Part of the CO2 which is passing through the silicone tube crosses the wall of
    the tubing, and enters the air. Tests have recently shown that this can cause the
    loss of up to 30% of the precious gas. I and a partner in the pharmaceuticals
    industry have run tests on no fewer than 10 kinds of tubing. As you might have
    guessed, silicone tubing turned out to be the most permeable of all, that is, the
    tubing which allowed the most gas to escape.

    "A solution to the problem?

    "Yes, there is a solution! The American company Cole-Parmer manufactures and
    distributes tubing made of TYGON�, which does not allow CO2 to get through.
    It is affordable, unlike the silicone tubing typically found in pet stores. Its
    reference number is R-3603. Being flexible, it is well-adapted to our
    installations. TYGON tubing exists in many interior and exterior diameters. It is
    not necessary to buy the thickest tubing available, but a thickness of 0.8 mm is a
    reasonable minimum. Obviously, the thicker the tubing, the more resistant it will
    be as time passes.

    "I would encourage all users of CO2 systems to change their silicone tubing for
    TYGON� tubing from Cole-Parmer. This will result in substantial savings of
    this precious gas, as well as a better functioning system. It's nonsense to mix in
    air with the CO2 and water in the reactor.

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