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Thread: Don't dump that fish!

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Don't dump that fish!

    The following is taken from the NSW DPI 'Don't Dump that Fish' website (Amendments by AquariumLife in blue):


    Protect our ecosystems!
    Keeping fish is fun, but it’s important to make sure living things in your aquarium or pond are kept away from our oceans and waterways.

    Most fish, snails, and plants you keep are not native to Australia, or to your local area. If released, they are difficult to eliminate and pose a serious threat to fragile ecosystems and important industries.

    Don't dump that fish!
    Setting fish free may mean they die from starvation or disease. Fish that survive and breed will compete with local native species for food and space. They may also spread disease and parasites, and damage natural habitats.

    Even if your fish are native species they should never be returned to waterways due to the risk of introducing aquarium diseases to the natural environment where native populations may have no resistance (and no one to treat them).

    Your plants are weeds!
    Unwanted plants from your aquarium or pond can choke waterways, displacing native plants and depleting oxygen and food for fish.

    Watch water & rocks!
    Water from your aquarium or pond may contain fish, snail or shrimp eggs, larvae, plant fragments, or diseases. The same is true for rocks and gravel. Dispose of waste water and other materials carefully.


    Be a responsible fish keeper!

    * Never dump fish, plants or snails into or near waterways, stormwater drains or the ocean. Heavy penalties apply.

    * Don't keep noxious species. You can be fined. See www.dpi.nsw.gov.au (fisheries section) for more information.

    * Don't buy fish, shrimp, plants or ‘live rock’ from overseas on the internet – it’s illegal! Use a reputable local dealer.

    * Give unwanted fish to friends or your petshop, or dispose of them humanely by putting them to sleep with clove oil added to a small container containing the fish and some tank water, or in an ice slurry and then freezing them (for tropical fish only).

    * Take care cleaning tanks or ponds. Tip waste water on the garden (gardens and pot plants love fish water!). Place solid waste like plants or gravel in the bin, or bury it. (Aquatic plants break down quickly and make excellent compost.)

    * Design ponds so that plants, snails, fish or eggs can’t escape during heavy rains, and screen all overflow areas. Consider keeping species native to your local area.

    * Look out for new species in local waterways. Report suspected pests.
    See this thread for state-by-state details on how to report pest fish.

  2. #2
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    The problem is not people on here or people like the majority of us, I am 99% sure.
    It comes from 2 areas.

    1: The one tank keeper that don't know the fish they keep are forgien, they liberate there unwanted pets thinking they are doing the warm and fuzzy bit. Linda gets a lot of people in here shop that don't know most of the fish they keep are from OS and think it is OK to let them go in a creek.

    2: The pond keeper that builds it in a flood area or has inadequate over flows, this is the major problem in Townsville's Ross river catchment, hence all the Cichlids in the River.

    OH and I just remembered a 3rd one, there is a religion that buys Gold fish keeps them a couple of days then releases them? and Linda had a crazy GREENY that bought fish to let them go, until we found out what she was doing and tried to let here know it was wrong and then told here and when she did not listen to OFF.

    Doc and I are on a committee up here looking at the problem and my suggestion is ALL fish bags by LAW should have nothing but a simple warning about not releasing fish in the wild and a big fine for those that do.


    Bob
    Last edited by northboy; 14-06-10 at 07:06 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboy View Post
    Doc and I are on a committee up here looking at the problem and my suggestion is ALL fish bags by LAW should have nothing but a simple warning about not releasing fish in the wild and a big fine for those that do.
    Bob
    That is a fab idea, I'd be happy to pay extra for the bags if I knew it did some good like that!

    Sadly your point on the majority of people not going to join a dedicated forum and read this seems true. My old neighbor kept medakas in a small, easily overflowing pond and one invited me to see her "native" fish. Australia, Japan, kind of the same I guess? I keep the same fish too, just not in the same way and with a little more concern as to where they could end up.

    Still, you see forum members talk about how the flush their fish down the toilet and other nonsense, so it's good to see stickys like this.
    Thanks for coming, and don't forget to purchase some orange drink, for the long drive home! -Principal Skinner

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboy View Post
    The problem is not people on here or people like the majority of us, I am 99% sure.
    It comes from 2 areas.

    1: The one tank keeper that don't know the fish they keep are forgien, they liberate there unwanted pets thinking they are doing the warm and fuzzy bit. Linda gets a lot of people in here shop that don't know most of the fish they keep are from OS and think it is OK to let them go in a creek.

    2: The pond keeper that builds it in a flood area or has inadequate over flows, this is the major problem in Townsville's Ross river catchment, hence all the Cichlids in the River.

    OH and I just remembered a 3rd one, there is a religion that buys Gold fish keeps them a couple of days then releases them? and Linda had a crazy GREENY that bought fish to let them go, until we found out what she was doing and tried to let here know it was wrong and then told here and when she did not listen to OFF.

    Doc and I are on a committee up here looking at the problem and my suggestion is ALL fish bags by LAW should have nothing but a simple warning about not releasing fish in the wild and a big fine for those that do.


    Bob
    Um, That's not a greeny, that's a nutter. A greeny cares about the environment and the animal they're dealing with. The person doing that clearly did neither.

    The people I know of that have released fish have been parents with young children that no longer want to care for the pets, so take Freddy the fish down to the local creek to swim free, while little Johnny gets to do their own version of Free Willy.

    Needless to say, when they told me about their good deed, they got an earful, and went away very red-faced, whether Johnny was there or not. Particularly since the LFS has a policy that they will buy back fish, and Johnny can get some pocket money and learn about capitalism instead, and the disposable pet trade. Now if I give or sell a fish to a young family I tell them how to appropriately dispose of the fish from the start.

  5. #5
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    I am constantly surprised by the number of people who are into fishkeeping and who think releasing fish into local creeks is okay and that doing so will give the fish a 'good home'. And I'm not just talking about goldfish, I've heard of oscars, african cichlids, gouramis, silver sharks, neon tetras, etc. being dumped into the Centennial Park ponds in Sydney. Even people who know they are tropical fish think that by dumping them in summer they will somehow adapt for winter. It beggars belief.

    The idea of having guidelines on fish bags is a very good one, LFS that get their own bags printed and wholesalers like Bayfish etc that supply bags to shops should really be doing this already.

  6. #6
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    It is early days at them moment but I am going to keep on my platform, DPI and Fisheries are listening, I just need to RAM IT HOME.

    What I would like to see is in big print. The fine like this,
    $10,000.00 fines apply for the release of fish into water ways, then a simple explanation of why.
    So Guys and Girls some ideas would be good so I can take it to the next meeting in a couple of weeks?? simple and to the point would be excellent please. I am stuck on this one yea I know my idea and I can not follow through but .

    Bob

  7. #7

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    I think that shops should have to recommend natives over ornamentals to a buyer after fish for a pond, and must have them avaliable for purchase..Local councils have local native seedlings avaliable for gardens, a similar plan could be adopted for ponds (with fish, but plants too).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboy View Post
    What I would like to see is in big print. The fine like this,
    $10,000.00 fines apply for the release of fish into water ways, then a simple explanation of why.
    So Guys and Girls some ideas would be good so I can take it to the next meeting in a couple of weeks?
    Bob
    a simple explanation is not really possible, at least in my opinion, because there are so many reasons that it is wrong to release non native fish into Australian waters.

  9. #9
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    you could have something like on ciggy packets. a disected intestine with parasites, a gold fish stuck down the throat of a cod etc.
    An angler is a man who spends rainy days sitting around on the muddy banks of rivers doing nothing because his wife won't let him do it at home.

  10. #10
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    Northboy:
    Great platform, stick to it! What about:

    Bold large print:
    $10,000.00 FINE APPLIES for releasing fish
    into our waterways

    Most fish will not survive and die a cruel death.
    Those that do will damage and contribute to wiping out our fragile native fish population and ecosystems.
    All released fish, plants and water can spread disease in our waterways that our native systems have little or no resistance to, including those flushed down toilets.
    Make sure any pond overflows cannot be releaded into our waterways, particularly on floodplains.

    Might be overstating it, but should get the point across to those who don't know, who are generally those who do it.

    Solomon:
    Absolutely. It was actually a Landcare group and the pond plant sales people that put me onto the native fish. At the LFS I have to ask every time, they are buried down the back of the displays. It's not just the risk of escape, they are also not eating the tadpoles here (the carp, sorry, goldfish do) and therefore reducing the already low frog population, as the eggs are still laid in the ponds with carp, wasting eggs each year. The risk of escapees up here are reasonable low, unless it is done deliberately, as we are 10k from the nearest waterway. But I still get upset about the lack of promotion of natives for outside ponds.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboy View Post

    my suggestion is ALL fish bags by LAW should have nothing but a simple warning about not releasing fish in the wild and a big fine for those that do.


    Bob
    Bob, Your suggestion has to be one of the smartest things I've ever heared! Lets hope the Aquarium industry implements this.

    Jeff

  12. #12
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    What about realising natives into a stream that has been destroyed by pollution, but is now on the rebound? I think things like shrimp, crayfish, fish can kickstart an ecosystem.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weq View Post
    What about realising natives into a stream that has been destroyed by pollution, but is now on the rebound? I think things like shrimp, crayfish, fish can kickstart an ecosystem.
    If you mean releasing them, there are still issues with disease spreading. Are you sure these are the species that are indiginous to that particular stream? Have you done your research - what is already in the stream and what are you going to be competing with?

    IMO leave releases to the experts. There is no excuse for any of us, or anyone other than the official Depts who have done appropriate impact studies doing releases into anything other than enclosed ponds, tanks or dams on private property where escapes are impossible and there are not existing indiginous wildlife populations that our well-meaning "releases" will have impacts on.

    In Landcare revegetation principles you never replant with seed collected more than 5k from the area you are planting from if at all possible, to keep the genetic stock as true to nature as possible. Why on earth would you go re-locating wildlife and think it's OK? It's the same thing as hybridising apistos or other fish, that everyone frowns on.

    Ending rant now... I could be wrong...

  14. #14
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    Here is a classic for you.

    Lake Echam, you know where the rainbow is extinct= Echaninsis, the powers that be decided to add the Barron river Splendida to the lake seing as the Echaminsis wont survive there any more. It wont survive because of the foreign fish there, Mouth Almighty's, Archer fish, Barred grunter and now Splendida.
    Yes they are native but Foreign to the lake.

    Go Figure.

    Bob

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboy View Post
    It is early days at them moment but I am going to keep on my platform, DPI and Fisheries are listening, I just need to RAM IT HOME.

    What I would like to see is in big print. The fine like this,
    $10,000.00 fines apply for the release of fish into water ways, then a simple explanation of why.
    So Guys and Girls some ideas would be good so I can take it to the next meeting in a couple of weeks?? simple and to the point would be excellent please. I am stuck on this one yea I know my idea and I can not follow through but .

    Bob
    This thread is a bit old but the aquarium industry also needs to take a more active role. Each and every aquarium/pet shop should never refuse trade ins. Even accepting the fish for free would be better than turning away a desperate fish owner. I would prefer shops to euthanaise or have a cheap sale tank for unwanted trade-ins. Education is also needed for the supposed experts too as they are the front line for public information.

    An attractive informative standardised poster in each shop would go a long way towards public awareness and make the pet industry look more cohesive and pro-active. You might as well have the carrot as well as the stick.

    Fish clubs and even online forums could also promote themselves a bit better by advertising they will take any unwanted fish as they have lots of members.
    Last edited by aquaholic99; 19-06-11 at 02:09 PM.

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