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Thread: New more virulent strain of white spot in Australia

  1. #1
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    Default New more virulent strain of white spot in Australia

    Hi all
    At our ANGFA National Committee meeting on Friday, one of our very trusted and knowledgeable people gave us a heads up about a new more virulent strain of white spot that has emerged in Australia.
    This new strain is visibly different from normal, in that the ‘white spots’ are larger than normal.
    The new strain is NOT responding to normal medications and treatments. At this stage there isn’t a ‘do this to fix’ answer yet. Recommended white spot treatment is still the best option at this stage. If I hear anything more I will add to this post.
    Angfa National will be placing a warning in its next newsletter for people to be extra diligent about quarantining fish, and doing extra net cleaning when transferring between tanks.
    This strain has been found in ‘commercial’ situations (that was the source of the information) so extra care should be taken when purchasing new fish from shops.

    Regards
    Natalie acting as ANGFA national Secretary.
    3 1/2' Jebo R3100 community tropical (Goby ruled )
    misc other small tanks
    ANGFA National secretary & VIC secretary
    "insanity is hereditary, you get it from your kids"

  2. #2
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    Thanks Natalie

    pre warned is a good thing

    Graeme
    Read this very helpful thread on BSS .
    No pictures on your BSS advert? Then be prepared for it to be deleted ( read the rules )

  3. #3
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    Default

    thanks for the heads up Natalie.

    A good reminder for people to quarantine any new arrivals.

  4. #4
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    And to clean any equipment well that you share between tanks!
    3 1/2' Jebo R3100 community tropical (Goby ruled )
    misc other small tanks
    ANGFA National secretary & VIC secretary
    "insanity is hereditary, you get it from your kids"

  5. #5
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    As an importer of fish, and being ion the industry now for quite a number of years, I would agree that there are a number of different "stains" of white spot, and some are quite nasty..... it is not something new, just comes in waves... about 20 years ago we termed an outbreak we had as "stay spot"... the only treatment (and my favourite for all white spot problems) is heat - anything above 31C.....
    90% of the time white spot problems are a result of stress on fish.... good thing about commercial fish is that they will (most of the time) have had contact with white spot and they tend to get an immunity from further white spot infections - where some people go wrong, is introduce local bred fish to commercial fish (that are still infected/carrying more than one problem) and the local fish are inundated with flukes/bacteria/viruses and of course, white spot.... as white spot is the obvious symptom, it is often the one that takes the blame for deaths..... so I agree and advocate the use of quarantine tanks for new fish arrivals... but remember, at the same time, treat for worms and flukes to minimise the transfer to clean stock.
    http://www.aquariumlife.com.au/showthread.php/5319-My-7x30x32-Planted-Tank-(DLW)

  6. #6
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    Hi Natalie

    This is interesting news as i recently noticed my female blue ramhad white spots that are much larger than normal ich... I am turning up the heater tomorrow for a few days to see how they go...

    Thanks for the information!

    Cheers
    Ben
    What The pseudomugil Furcatus was that!?

  7. #7
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    Your rams will be fine at the higher temperature Rahmad.
    I've got rams in my 6 foot community tank and have in the past run the tank at 31 degrees for a 2 week period to knock the white spot.
    It's important to reduce the temperature gradually when going back to normal running temperature though.
    After the 2 weeks at 31 degrees I dropped mine down by 1 degree every second day until normal temp was reached.
    common sense................it's very uncommon.

  8. #8
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    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ich.php

    Good reading One thing to be sure of as contained in the article - if you treat treat for two weeks. If not you risk creating a strain with resistance to a med.

    If one med does not work - change to one with a differnet active ingredient. For example I don;t like copper based (as copper builds u and is difficult to remove) but for some strains - I would reach for copper based remedies.

    HTH

    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ich.php

  9. #9
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    I think I have this in my tank, just noticed a couple of fish tonight when I did a water change that have white spots on them. I was just logging on to ask what eveyone thought it was when I found this thread. You guys are always on top of things. I will try the higher temp first as I really dont want to treat it chemically. I will let you know how it goes. cheers Clif
    Clif Irwin

  10. #10

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    I myself had similar prob with my blue diamond discus larger than norm itch.I tried norm whitespot remidy all it did was kill everytyhing (fish) except itch and also promithyisol no luck.Was using salt and temp 34 c.Isolatded poor fellow finally as other fish had no signs treated more than recomend dose of protozin, and took over a month for it to stop comming back.Nearly 4 months in total a lot of dead fish from the chems.

  11. #11
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    WOW, a month on Protozin, that's heavy considering it's the best product out there imo. I was reading an article recently that said there's a strain showing up in USA whereby the protozoans are immuned to temps above 92 degrees! I blame the Asian fish market for most of the resistence to drugs as they have the "let's dose just in case" mentality, especially with anti-biotics, sigh.
    Chardy sippin', bitter, twisted, sour 'ol cow. Do not let your fantasies run away with your capabilities .... you, boy, are NO match for my blow torch! Boguns, you just keep on rollin'

  12. #12
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    Remember of course, if you're raising the temperature of your tanks to increase oxygen as well if possible. At least try to increase surface movement to add o2 exchange. You don't want your fish gasping for air when trying to heal them.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
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    Jun 2008
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    QLD, Mackay
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    I saw some odd whitspot-like lesions at the end of 2009. I helped someone treat their tank of guppies that kept dying in 4 week cycles due to white spot that would not respond to standard pet-shop treatment. Interesting that this strain was very good at killling fish (more than usual). The guppies had larger lesions than normal and the protozoa looked different under the microscope. Thankfully it responded well to salt and elevated temperature and has not appeared again, now that some of the stressors have been corrected in her tank cleaning and maintenance.

  14. #14
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    I have a question/comment about white-spot. I've recently had to deal with it for the first time and after reading up a little on white spot my opinion of how to kill the stuff was quite simple (and it has worked well for me so far *touch wood*). No need to change the temperature or add chemicals and it doesnt matter how resistant the strain is. Simply do the following:

    1) Put a 1 micron filter into the tank. This can be simply attached to the intake of a canister which I've done before for clearing up sediment. You can actually also buy inline filters for this whcih are normally used to filter drinking water.
    Reason: The free swimming white spot stage swims incredibly slowly like 4m/hour and are about 3 microns in size. So any decent filtration would filtered the tank several times by then and the 1 micron filter would trap all the free swimming stages. And since they only last for about 24 hours before dying its quite efficient in removing that stage.

    2) Do a gravel vacc every day. Might be useful to put all affected fish into a bare bottom tank to do this. Regular water changes also helps alot.
    Reason: This stage lasts for a few days during which the white spot divides in the gravel. Hence if you gravel vacc followed by water change, it removes them even before they have a change to hatch. Bare bottom tank obviously makes this really easy. And the eggs of the white spot are also bigger than 3 microns so your micron filter should pick this up too if its floating around.

    Existing treatment with salt and chemicals is only effective when the stuff is free swimming which lasts only about 1 day. Doesnt work the rest of the time. And increasing the temp stresses fish out too. The main point however is that it doesnt matter how chemical or heat resistant the buggers are, they're gonna get sucked out either way.

    So whats wrong with what i've suggested because I'm sure other people have thought of this too so I'm assuming theres something im missing.

  15. #15
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    Default ich / white spot

    Aargh! Stupid!

    I gave my 620T ich! Probably by failing to quarantine 3 checkerboard cichlids I got last week. Nothing else was introduced into the tank except those and live blackworms. Can't be the blackworms since my other three tanks got fed them too but didn't get ich.

    I'm trying to treat them with raising temps and adding salt, but want advice on quantity of salt. I'm planning a dosage of 1 tbsp / 20 litres = 6 tbsp for what I estimate to be 120 litres of water in my tank. I started this afternoon and hoping to raise it to full dosage over the next 48 hrs.

    Is that enough? I have a pair of blue rams, two bristlenoses, 4 black neons, about 15 cardinals, and those three checkerboards. I don't mind if the couple of cherry shrimp in there die. There are also lots of crypts, some anubias, one aponogeton, one amazon sword, some moss and some java fern.

    I don't really want to use malachite green yet as I heard that the fish and plants I have are more sensitive to meds than most.

    So far, nothing has died yet. Cross my fingers. Touch wood.

    Please, no 'I told you so' regarding quarantine. I may have learnt my lesson.

    Just want advice re salt dosage first.

    If you have had success treating ich on Rams and cardies in a planted tank, please share.

    I don't think success in treatment with hard water tanks or unplanteds can be compared here.

    Help!

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