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MrFish
16-06-07, 09:54 PM
Just wondering that if i keep activated carbon in my canister and use ferts, does the activated carbon absorb nutrients that should stay in the water for my plants?

Also since ill be redoing my system during the week i was thinking of removing the carbon and just fill with extra media, but, maybe should i leave the carbon in there for the run in as there would be beneficial colonies on there?

Just brainstorming for now before i do the big job and any help would be great! :)

Cheers,
Mike

holotype
16-06-07, 10:49 PM
Carbon is often used in newly set-up tanks, however its active life deteriorates markedly after a few weeks. It is of most use to remove some toxins or other impurities. Its absorbent properties are of no benefit to the bacteria.

Stealth
17-06-07, 06:37 PM
There will be bacterer in there - is a surface that has water flow, so personally I would leave it in while it cycles, then replace. As Holotype has said, if it is old, it's not doing any absorbing anymore so you can't loose. Replace it when you do the first filter clean IMHO.

MrFish
17-06-07, 08:46 PM
Thanks guys sounds good :)
Carbon is only 1 month old btw...

So just to make sure as its not clear to me still in terms of ferts and beneficial plant nutrients, the carbon does not interfier or remove any nutrients from added ferts within the water column? Just want to make sure my plants will not be lacking anythig if i continue use after a few more weeks.

Cheers,
Mike

Matt31
18-06-07, 05:17 AM
Yes, carbon does remove ferts from the water.

It removes a lot of chemicals from water.

Remove it once your tank is cycled.

Your plants will do best without it.

Also, fish can't thrive in pure water. They need minerals too.

In some remote parts of the world, drinking water is prepared by carbon filtering only. It is a very effective filter.

Stealth
18-06-07, 10:44 AM
Yes, what Matt has said is correct... but it is also correct that is blocks up and looses it's ability to absorb. Some say it last only days, others a couple of weeks. As your is over a month old I would say it's going to have negligable effect but sure, remove after cycling.

Matt31
18-06-07, 12:03 PM
Just to reiterate, carbon loses it's adsorbtion (not absorbtion) very quickly. IMO it is in the order of a couple of days.

If you leave the carbon in after cycling, it is taking up space better used by some bio filtering media (noodles etc).

SkullJug
18-06-07, 12:47 PM
I personally never use carbon. It absorbs dissolved organic carbon, which continues to create ammonia while being locked away where it cannot be removed by water changes. And yes, it removes nutrients from the water which will effect your plants.

shake
18-06-07, 02:27 PM
I personally never use carbon. It absorbs dissolved organic carbon, which continues to create ammonia while being locked away where it cannot be removed by water changes. And yes, it removes nutrients from the water which will effect your plants.

I agree with SJ. I no longer use carbon in my tank.

If you are using it to clear the water, get a product call Purigen from Seachem. Last much, much longer than carbon and can be regenerated quite a few times.

SkullJug
18-06-07, 05:27 PM
I agree with SJ. I no longer use carbon in my tank.

If you are using it to clear the water, get a product call Purigen from Seachem. Last much, much longer than carbon and can be regenerated quite a few times.

My turn to agree with Shake - Purigen is good stuff. Crystal clear water, long lasting, can be regenerated and won't effect your ferts

MrFish
18-06-07, 06:11 PM
Great! Thanks for the replies guys :)

I guess ill leave it ther for the run in and try the purigen if i need to clear up the water. Ive read about it in a few other posts and sounds ilke good stuff.

Ive used BioChem Zorb in the past but that was just to clear up the colour in the water seeping out from the drifwood. Worked very well.

Hows it compare to the purigen? Has anyone used both?

R3N
23-04-08, 01:47 AM
sorry to dig up an old thread... i was reading somewhere that activated carbon can be used to remove chlorine as well as chloramine. is this true?

also i have a carbon pad in my cannister filter (which I didn't know was in there until I took it out to clean) and its about 2 months old, would it be a good idea to leave it in there as a sort of filtering pad?

Matt31
23-04-08, 10:11 AM
Dig up old threads please!!! It saves having millions of threads all on the same topic.

Activated carbon will adsorb chlorine and chloramine. But you would have to carbon filter the water before filling your tank.

Personally I'd use a dechlorinating product to be on the safe side.

New filters come with carbon pads to soak up the chemicals that come out of new plastic.

R3N
23-04-08, 10:27 AM
in that case, wouldnt using carbon filtration be a better option than dechlorinators? as some shrimp are sensitive to them